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I have a simpe object in javascript which has few methods..Two of them I want to periodicaly call with window.setTimeout functions. My current code looks like this.

var shakeResolver = function () {
 var resolveTimeout;
 console.log(this);
 var context = this;
 this.startShakeResolve = function () {
     this.resolveTimeout = window.setTimeout(this.call(context.stopShakeResolve, context), 2000);
     $(window)
         .on('devicemotion', this.onDeviceMotion);
 };

 this.onDeviceMotion = function (event) {};

 this.stopShakeResolve = function (context) {
     this.resolveTimeout = window.setTimeout(context.startShakeResolve, settings.interval);

 };

}

The problem is apparently in my misunderstanding how scopes are working, it looks like when calling the function from timeout, it is called from another context where it actually doesn't exist?

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In the first call to setTimeout, you're executing a function immediately and actually passing its return value (which happens to be undefined) as the function to call after the timeout. (Edit: that is, of course, assuming that your use of this.call invokes the usual Function.call and not your own variation.) –  DCoder Oct 4 '12 at 8:09
1  
What is this? Is it a function? How are you calling shakeResolver? To learn more about this, have a look at developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/…. –  Felix Kling Oct 4 '12 at 8:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Modified code: Scope of setTimeout is always window Object. you can Change context of function using call apply and bind(bind is not supported by older IE browsers IE <= 8 ).

var shakeResolver = function() {
    this.resolveTimeout;
    console.log(this);
    var context = this;
    this.startShakeResolve = function() {
        this.resolveTimeout = window.setTimeout(function() {
            context.stopShakeResolve.apply(context, arguments);
        }, 2000);

        $(window).on('devicemotion', function(){
                    context.onDeviceMotion.apply(context, arguments);
            });
    };

    this.onDeviceMotion = function(event) {
    };

    this.stopShakeResolve = function(context) {
        this.resolveTimeout = window.setTimeout(function() {
            context.startShakeResolve.apply(context, arguments)
        }, settings.interval);

    };
}
share|improve this answer

call() takes as first parameter the context which the function is called from. This means that your this.call(context.stopShakeResolve, context) makes your context be context.stopShakeResolve which means that when the function is called this is equivalent to context.stopShakeResolve.

Just to make it clearer:

this.stopShakeResolve = function (context) {
    this.resolveTimeout = window.setTimeout(context.startShakeResolve, settings.interval);
};

Does not have a function inside it called shakeResolver so it would throw an exception on you saying that it does not have property or method called this way. Change the call to the following:

this.stopShareResolve.call(this, context)
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