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I have some code that filters through a collection of sorted objects according to a filter value. For instance, I want to find the objects where Name=="searchquery". Then I want to take the top X values from that collection.

My questions:

  • My collection is a List<T>. Does this collection guarantee the sort order?

  • If so, is there a built-in way to find the the top X objects that satisfy the condition? I'm looking for something like

    collection.FindAll(o=>o.Name=="searchquery",100);
    

    That would give me the top 100 objects that satisfy the condition. The reason is performance, once I've found my 100 objects, I don't want to keep checking the entire collection.

  • If i write:

    collection.FindAll(o=>o.Name=="searchquery").Take(100);
    

    will the runtime be intelligent enough to stop checking once it hits 100?

I can of course implement this myself, but if there is a built-in way (like a LInQ method) I'd prefer to use it.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
collection.Where(o=>o.Name=="searchquery").Take(100)

The order should be in the same order as the original list, and it will stop checking once it takes 100 elements (Where returns an enumeration which is only evaluated as you take elements). From the documentation:

This method is implemented by using deferred execution. The immediate return value is an object that stores all the information that is required to perform the action. The query represented by this method is not executed until the object is enumerated either by calling its GetEnumerator method directly or by using foreach in Visual C# or For Each in Visual Basic.

If you need a different sort order, you will have to specify it (this of course means you have no choice but to examine all elements though).

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Of course. The collection is sorted from the beginning since its basically created by enumerating a sorted SQL query. –  DukeOf1Cat Oct 4 '12 at 8:34
    
I also just stumbled upon TakeWhile(), which seems to do what I want –  DukeOf1Cat Oct 4 '12 at 8:34
    
@JoelWKall Well, TakeWhile will do just that, continue to take items as long as a condition is met. I'm not sure this exactly fits your description of "top 100 items that satisfy the condition". It will stop taking items as soon as the query fails. –  lc. Oct 4 '12 at 8:46
    
OK, thats not what I want. I'll use While and Take then, thanks! –  DukeOf1Cat Oct 4 '12 at 9:28
    
A quick follow-up question: FindAll() executes directly, but Where() executes when I enumerate, basically, it doesn't calculate more than needed. I can't think of a situation where FindAll() is better. Is it only there for backwards compatibility reasons? –  DukeOf1Cat Oct 4 '12 at 10:02

Ok,

My collection is a List<T>. Does this collection guarantee the sort order?

No, but it will preserve the order of insertion.

If so, is there a built-in way to find the the top X objects that satisfy the condition?

     someEnumerable.Where(r => r.Name == "searchquery").Take(100)

If i write:

    // Some linq that works

will the runtime be intelligent enough to stop checking once it hits 100?

Yes, probably


Now, if you have a IList that has been sorted and you want to quickly iterate the top 100 items do this.

var list = sourceEnumerable.OrderBy(r => r.Name).ToList();
foreach(var r in list.Where(r => r.Name == "searchquery").Take(100))
{
    // Do something
}
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 collection.Where(o=>o.Name=="searchquery").Take(100)

Is the most correct answer, because behind the scene Where is deferred execution, below is how Where method is implemented:

Where(this IEnumerable<T>, Func<T, bool> func)
{
    foreach (var item in collection)
    {
        if (func(item))
        {
            yield return item;
        }
    }
}

So when calling Take(100), the loop just finds first 100 items which satisfy the criteria.

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If you know for sure that the objects in your collection are not repeated (e.g.like a primary key), then you can use SortedList instead of List<T>. This will guarantee, that your list will be sorted when you filter it using a certain criteria. Have a look here for sorted list example:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.collections.sortedlist(v=vs.100).aspx

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