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I have these two classes which represent some stock data. They do not have any behavior in them. These classes have some common data like ExchangeSymbol, MySymbol and Time. Do you think abstracting these to a base class a good idea?. Please share your thoughts.

class SymbolData
{
    public string ExchangeSymbol { get; set; }
    public string MySymbol { get; set; }
    public double Price { get; set; }
    public int Volume { get; set; }
    public string Time { get; set; }
}

class EquityQuoteData 
{
    public string ExchangeSymbol { get; set; }
    public string MySymbol { get; set; }
    public double AskPrice { get; set; }
    public double BidPrice { get; set; }
    public int AskVolumne { get; set; }
    public int BidVolumne { get; set; }
    public string Time { get; set; }
}
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3 Answers 3

If ExchangeSymbol, MySymbol and Time are somewhat related, group them in a reusable class and make it member of SymbolData and EquityQuoteData (favor composition over inheritance). If they are not: don't!

Remember: Inheritance/polymorphism is mostly about behaviour and not about data. Inheritance in value objects may cause unwanted side effects - e.g. equals doesn't play nice here.

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I wouldn't create a third (base) class for no good reason.

You could make EquityQuoteData inherit from SymbolData since they share most properties, although the former has AskPrice and BidPrice in place of Price, which is not used in the child class.

Consider implementing a common interface:

interface IData
{
    string ExchangeSymbol { get; set; }
    string MySymbol { get; set; }
    string Time { get; set; }
}

And then:

class SymbolData : IData
{
    public double Price { get; set; }
    public int Volume { get; set; }

    public string IData.ExchangeSymbol
    {
        get; set;
    }

    public string IData.MySymbol
    {
        get; set;
    }

    public string IData.Time
    {
        get; set;
    }
}

class EquityQuoteData : IData
{
    public double AskPrice { get; set; }
    public double BidPrice { get; set; }
    public int AskVolumne { get; set; }
    public int BidVolumne { get; set; }

    public string IData.ExchangeSymbol
    {
        get; set;
    }

    public string IData.MySymbol
    {
        get; set;            
    }

    public string IData.Time
    {
        get; set;
    }
}

Anyhow, if you have to do this:

public double AskPrice { get; set; }
public double BidPrice { get; set; }
public int AskVolumne { get; set; }
public int BidVolumne { get; set; }

It's also a code smell, all this prefixing.

I'd consider putting price and volumne (?) in one class, whatever it name might be, and then give your EquityQuoteData class two properties - Ask and Bid - both of the same type. SymbolData would only have one.

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One way of looking at inheritance is to think about the has-a and is-a relationships.

If you had some base class (Data is common to both names) Data then you would have to be sure that the sentances "EquityQuoteData is a (type of) Data" and "SymbolData is a (type of) Data".

Another handy way to think about it is to ask: Can you replace all instances of Data in a scentance with any derived type and still have the scentance make sense?

For example:

I had a lot of Data items to process today.

I had a lot of EquityQuoteData items to process today.

In your case I would need to know more about the roles of each class, but I would say probably yes you should abstract out the common features of related classes.

On an unrelated note, that is basically a struct not a class. I would look into encapsulation and other OO design principles (Google SOLID)

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