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.PHONY: b
c: a
    @touch c
    @echo "Changed"
a: b
b:
    @date +%s > a

Running make with the sample make file causes "Changed" to be printed the 1st time it is run; but "Changed" is only printed then on the 3rd, 5th, etc execution. This is because make doesn't seem to recognize that executing the recipe for target "b" updates a.

Changing the rule with "a" as the target into an empty recipe causes "Changed" to be printed for each time make is run (as you would expect - where phony targets are always considered "out of date"). E.g.

a: b ;

Make should skip the implicit rule search for PHONY targets, but "a" is not PHONY. If no implicit rule is found for "a", is make correct to not consider that "a" may have been changed by its PHONY dependency "b"?

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A phony which changes a different target is a pretty convoluted corner case. What would you expect to happen and why? –  tripleee Oct 4 '12 at 10:14
    
Also I think you mean @date +%s >a without the Useless Use Award for echo and backticks. partmaps.org/era/unix/award.html#echo –  tripleee Oct 4 '12 at 10:15
    
@tripleee This is a simplified case from a production makefile, where there a common "rules" makefile included by other application makefiles. In this case applications define a "LIBS" variable that has synonyms for some core libraries (e.g. LIBS := foo, links in libfoo.a from another part of the codebase) - these synonyms are defined in the rules makefile to invoke the makefile of the related core library and ensures that the library is built into the application binary - and the synonyms are obviously PHONY. Removed the useless echo above too (Thanks). –  CodeButcher Oct 4 '12 at 12:31
    
@tripleee In the case described above, if a file in the core library is modified and then an application is rebuilt, the core library is rebuilt (as you'd expect) but the application itself is not; make believes the core library is older than the application. Running make again then causes the application to be rebuilt (with the updated core library linked in). What I would expect is that make would recognize that after running the recipe for a phony target on which a file target is dependant, we should re-evaluate the mtime for the file target, just in case it has been updated. –  CodeButcher Oct 4 '12 at 12:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make can't analyze the effects of commands, so it is the user's responsibility to organize the rules correctly.

Consider a slightly different case:

d: c b
c: a
    @touch c
    @echo "Changed"
a:
b:
    @date +%s > a

This has the same behavior as your example; there's no way Make could be expected to know that c "really" depends on b. The author of the makefile is at fault.

Now the way it should be written:

c: a
        @touch c
        @echo "Changed"

.PHONY: a
a:
        @date +%s > a

The a rule modifies the file a (and PHONY is there just to force the a rule to run). This is the way to tell make that the @date ... command modifies a. This makefile works correctly.

Your example is midway between these two. If a rule modifies a file which is the target of another rule, the makefile is badly organized, and Make is not at fault. Yes, Make could assume that a target that depends on a PHONY rule may have been updated when that rule is run, but it could just as well assume that any target may have been updated when any rule is run. And if Make were that paranoid, it wouldn't be very efficient.

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Rather than declaring "a" as PHONY - would it be better to make "a" a double colon rule? –  CodeButcher Oct 4 '12 at 14:14
    
In general I get your point, that the rule for "a" should include the recipe for creating/updating "a". But I disagree that your example case is the same as that posed in my question. In your example, "a" does not depend on "b" so I would not expect make to consider "a" may have been updated by "b" - but that is just my opinion (and the question was just to find out what the actual answer is). Many Thanks. –  CodeButcher Oct 5 '12 at 11:50
    
@CodeButcher: a double-colon rule would be better, yes, I hadn't thought of that. I agree that my first example is not exactly the same as yours; I wrote it as a more extreme example of a case where c actually depends on b but is not a prerequisite, to illustrate the idea that Make cannot be expected to deduce everything. The "actual answer" is probably historical, it was just designed that way, but my point is that the the current state is a pretty good division of responsibility between Make and user: we can tell it what the preqs are, and it trusts us to do so. –  Beta Oct 5 '12 at 13:23

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