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I've been using a custom __isset() function already for a long time, which basically only exists to make the code look better and saves time typing:

function __isset(&$aVariable, $aDefault = null) {
    return isset($aVariable) ? $aVariable : $aDefault;
}

But today I found out that this function is actually creating the variable if it doesn't exist! And this is a huge problem when you are checking for array properties:

$lArray = ('A', 'B', 'C');
$lValue = __isset($lArray[4], 'D');
print_r($lArray); // Outputs 0=>'A', 1=>'B', 2=>'C', 3=>NULL

So what I want is to duplicate the current isset() function from PHP and change it to do what I want. The problem is that I cannot find the actual isset() function in the PHP source code...

A lot of frameworks are using an isset() function like I showed in first example, and I cannot image that I'm the first one who bump into this problem.

So my questions are:

  1. Where can I find the actual isset() PHP function?
  2. Where can I find the actual isset() C function (the real implementation)?
  3. How to change the code so that it returns the value, or the specified default value?
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3  
Why. Just, why? At a guess a value is set because you're passing a reference, not a value. –  Jon Stirling Oct 4 '12 at 9:40
3  
Just BTW, Creating an alternative isset() function won't prevent php from throwing warnings for unset variables/indexes –  Touki Oct 4 '12 at 9:53
    
If the isset function in C can accept non-existant variables, so can a duplicate of the function in C. That is the whole reason why I want to duplicate the isset function in the core. –  Raymond Oct 4 '12 at 13:05
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3 Answers

Why all this? Remove & and thats it:

function __isset($aVariable, $aDefault = null) {
    return isset($aVariable) ? $aVariable : $aDefault;
}
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1  
if you remove & you would get Notice: Undefined offset error –  Baba Oct 4 '12 at 9:53
    
I'd say the warnings are a separate issue. –  Jon Stirling Oct 4 '12 at 10:02
1  
We are programming in a way that there will be no notices, warnings or errors at all. So this is not an option. We also do not suppress error messages with @ since this leads to undesired results in some cases. –  Raymond Oct 4 '12 at 13:00
    
@Raymond Ok, no notices, no @. So you are going to modify language core and recompile it and make all your scripts not-compatible with normal PHP. Funny. –  Petr Oct 4 '12 at 13:44
    
@Petr I find it funny you say it that way... In which way is a custom PHP compilation, or an added PHP extension or an added Apache extension not-compatible with normal PHP? You are just adding functions, which extensions are invented for! –  Raymond Oct 5 '12 at 6:41
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Check if the array key exist before the actual comparison using array_key_exist

$lArray = array('A','B','C');
$LValue = array_key_exists(2, $lArray)?$lArray[2]:'D';
echo $LValue;

sure you have to modify __isset to special handle arrays

share|improve this answer
    
The reason people are using the function as I described above is that the don't want to write such code for readability, otherwise I could also have done: $lValue = isset($lArray[4]) ? $lArray[4] : 'D'; –  Raymond Oct 4 '12 at 12:57
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Removing the & sign alone would generate Notice: Undefined offset: 4 in What i think you should do is remove the & and suppress any E_NOTICE error with @ ;

$lArray = array('A', 'B', 'C');
$lValue = __isset(@$lArray[4], 'D'); // or @__isset($lArray[4], 'D');

var_dump($lValue);
var_dump($lArray);

function __isset($aVariable, $aDefault = null) {
    return isset($aVariable) ? $aVariable : $aDefault ;
}

Output (with no E_NOTICE error)

string 'D' (length=1)
array
  0 => string 'A' (length=1)
  1 => string 'B' (length=1)
  2 => string 'C' (length=1)

Another solution is use another isset to manager array and object

$lArray = array('A','B','C');
$lValue = __issetComplex($lArray, 4, 'D');

var_dump($lValue);
var_dump($lArray);


function __issetComplex($mixed, $key, $aDefault = null) {
    if (is_array($mixed))
        return array_key_exists($key, $mixed) ? $mixed[$key] : $aDefault;
    if (is_object($mixed))
        return isset($mixed->key) ? $mixed->key : $aDefault;
    return $aDefault;
}

Lastly you can just override PHP isset function on your own see override_function

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is, you have to place @ in all function calls - not the function itself. –  Petr Oct 4 '12 at 10:08
    
@Petr have updated the code with another way out ... –  Baba Oct 4 '12 at 10:11
    
We are programming in a way that there will be no notices, warnings or errors at all. So this is not an option. We also do not suppress error messages with @ since this leads to undesired results in some cases. –  Raymond Oct 4 '12 at 13:02
    
Also overriding the isset function is not what we want... isset returns boolean, we want to return the value or a default one. And since the isset function is the only function in PHP that does allow non-existant variables to be passed, this is an exceptional function. That's why we want to duplicate it in C. –  Raymond Oct 4 '12 at 13:03
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