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i am using google app engine on my server (listen --address=0.0.0.0 all network) my application a short time correctyl(i get some users input, some process,show the data and insert mysql db) after i take this error message and web browser didn't show anything, my system: google app engine, python 2.7, mysql(via rdbms) i change the port(8080,8091,8090vs...) or restart app engine, my applicayion again work but after then again same error message

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Python27\lib\SocketServer.py", line 284, in _handle_request_noblock
    self.process_request(request, client_address)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\SocketServer.py", line 310, in process_request
    self.finish_request(request, client_address)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\SocketServer.py", line 323, in finish_request
    self.RequestHandlerClass(request, client_address, self)
  File "C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\google_appengine\google\appengine\tools\dev_appserver.py", line 2734, in __init__
    BaseHTTPServer.BaseHTTPRequestHandler.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\SocketServer.py", line 639, in __init__
    self.handle()
  File "C:\Python27\lib\BaseHTTPServer.py", line 343, in handle
    self.handle_one_request()
  File "C:\Python27\lib\BaseHTTPServer.py", line 313, in handle_one_request
    self.raw_requestline = self.rfile.readline(65537)
  File "C:\Python27\lib\socket.py", line 476, in readline
    data = self._sock.recv(self._rbufsize)
error: [Errno 10054]
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try a different browser. Chrome can cause errors in single threaded applications due to it's "prefetch" mode. You can turn that mode off in Chrome. –  Paul Collingwood Oct 4 '12 at 10:25

2 Answers 2

Try switching to a more serious networking framework, not based on a toy HTTP server (BaseHTTPServer is a toy HTTP server).

10054 is the Windows error ECONNRESET. This indicates that the connection your HTTP server is trying to read from has been closed. It's not exactly an error condition - connections get closed, it's a normal part of their lifecycle - but the Google AppEngine (development!) server you're using seems to be treating it as an error. Perhaps in doing so it ends up responding incorrectly to other requests as well.

A correct HTTP server will not have a problem dealing with this situation.

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Well, the problem is that he's trying to run the AppEngine development server as a real server. It's not one, and never pretends to be: it's for local development only. –  Daniel Roseman Oct 4 '12 at 21:25
    
And that's why I recommend he stop using a toy HTTP server! Perhaps he should switch to Google's real live AppEngine deployment. Presumably that's somewhat more production-worthy? I don't know, but I think we can agree that what he's using now is a toy. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Oct 5 '12 at 0:16
    
what is your suggestion? which python based web framework, web2py django pyramid –  user1622511 Oct 5 '12 at 6:29
    
I'm a pretty big fan of Twisted, myself (also one of the developers). To some extent, the choice depends on what your application needs to do. But if Twisted by itself doesn't offer enough tools to make the task easy, Django running on Twisted Web's WSGI container probably does. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Oct 5 '12 at 15:08

The AppEngine development server is indeed pretty limited (single-threaded, HTTP 1.0 only, not robust to connection resets), but it is the only option for emulating in a local dev. environment the behavior of the production server, including stubs to AppEngine services and sandboxing of some modules (including os and socket).

Until Google provide us with a more robust alternative, I added exception handlers for the expected socket errors in the handle_one_request method of BaseHTTPServer.py (located in the Lib subdir of the Python installation directory)

[end of BaseHTTPServer.py::handle_one_request() - Python 2.7]
  except socket.error as socket_error:
    import errno
    if socket_error.errno in (errno.ECONNABORTED, errno.WSAECONNABORTED, errno.ECONNRESET, errno.WSAECONNRESET):      
      pass
    else:
      raise

ECONNABORTED/WSAECONNABORTED is happening on remote disconnects - see Python issue 14574 for details.

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