Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using simple-xml to perform XML serialization/deserialization in my Java application. I have a class as follows:

@Root(name="config")
public class Config{
    @Element(name="update_interval")
    private int updateInterval;

    @Element(name="timestamp")
    private long timestamp;

    //...
    //...
}

Now, this would produce XML like the following:

<config>
    <update_interval>2000</update_interval>
    <timestamp>1234567890</timestamp>
</config>

Question:

How can I override the element name at runtime, so that in some cases, the XML reads as follows?

<config>
    <updt_int>2000</updt_int>
    <ts>1234567890</ts>
</config>

Edit:

To clarify, I want to override the element names only in some cases. So basically,

if(condition){
    //Override Element Names
} else {
    //Serialize Normally
}
share|improve this question
    
Why @Element(name="updt_int") and @Element(name="ts") don't fit to your needs? –  Florent Oct 4 '12 at 9:46
    
Interesting. The most obvious way that springs to my mind is to use an ElementUnion with your own custom types, so that the element name changes depending on the type of your storage variable. But that seems a bit hacky... –  Matt Gibson Oct 4 '12 at 10:13
    
@Florent Like I mentioned in the Q, I want this overriding only in some cases. Long Answer: I am using this for a RESTful web service and depending on the URL of the request, I would like to have two separate representations of the same resource. –  curioustechizen Oct 4 '12 at 10:18
    
@MattGibson Yes - that was what I though of too. But the thing is, they really are the same type with just different representations. I suppose this can be achieved using Converter or VisitorStrategy - I just can't figure out exactly how. –  curioustechizen Oct 4 '12 at 10:19
1  
Yes, looks like a Visitor is the best way to go. This is the closest I can find to a half-decent example: old.nabble.com/… but sadly I'm at (non-Java-based) work today, so I can't fiddle and try stuff out... –  Matt Gibson Oct 4 '12 at 11:43

1 Answer 1

I found an easy way to achieve serialization in this case, thanks to this comment.

However, I haven't been able to de-serialize such an XML document. Here's my partial solution:

/*
 * Config.java
 */

@Root(name="config", strict = false)
public class Config {

    @Element(name="timestamp", required = false)
    private long timestamp;

    @Element(name = "update_interval", required = false)
    private int updateInterval;

    public Config() {
    }

    public int getUpdateInterval() {
        return updateInterval;
    }

    public void setUpdateInterval(int updateInterval) {
        this.updateInterval = updateInterval;
    }

    public long getTimestamp() {
        return timestamp;
    }

    public void setTimestamp(long timestamp) {
        this.timestamp = timestamp;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Config{" +
                "timestamp=" + timestamp +
                ", updateInterval=" + updateInterval +
                '}';
    }
}



/*
 * Custom Visitor implementation
 */
public class MyInterceptor implements Visitor {

    private static int sReadCount = 0;
    private static int sWriteCount = 0;
    @Override
    public void read(Type field, NodeMap<InputNode> node) throws Exception {
        /*
         * This is where I need help!
         *
         * 
         * This method is only called once: for the <config> node
         * It is not called for the other nodes since they are not "recognized" 
         * i.e., there are no annotations for the nodes <ts> and <updt_int>
         */

        System.out.println("Read Count : "+ (++sReadCount));
        System.out.println(node.getName());
        System.out.println(node.getNode());

    }

    @Override
    public void write(Type field, NodeMap<OutputNode> node) throws Exception {

        /* 
         * This works like a charm.
         */
        System.out.println("Write Count : "+ (++sWriteCount));
        OutputNode opNode = node.getNode();
        if("timestamp".equals(opNode.getName())){
            opNode.setName("ts");
        }
        if("update_interval".equals(opNode.getName())){
            opNode.setName("updt_int");
        }

    }

}

/*
 *
 */ Main class
public class Bootstrap {

    static final Random RANDOM = new Random();
    public static void main(String [] args){
        Config cfg = new Config();
        cfg.setTimestamp(RANDOM.nextLong());
        cfg.setUpdateInterval(1000);

        Serializer serializer = new Persister(new VisitorStrategy(new MyInterceptor()));

        StringWriter writer = new StringWriter();
        try {
            serializer.write(cfg, writer);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        String serialized = writer.toString();
        System.out.println(serialized);

        Config desCfg = null;
        try {
            desCfg = serializer.read(Config.class, serialized);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        if(desCfg != null){
            System.out.println(desCfg.toString());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.