Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using Jquery email Regex for validation as below:

@"^((([a-z]|\d|[!#\$%&'*+-/=\?\^_{\|}~]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])+(\.([a-z]|\d|[!#\$%&'\*\+\-\/=\?\^_{\|}~]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])+))|((\x22)((((\x20|\x09)(\x0d\x0a))?(\x20|\x09)+)?(([\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x7f]|\x21|[\x23-\x5b]|[\x5d-\x7e]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(\([\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0d-\x7f]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF]))))(((\x20|\x09)(\x0d\x0a))?(\x20|\x09)+)?(\x22)))@((([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])([a-z]|\d|-|.|_|~|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])*([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF]))).)+(([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])([a-z]|\d|-|.|_|~|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])*([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])))$"

Not sure why it does not allow for uppercase?! If email address should not contain any upper case or anything is wrong here.

share|improve this question
1  
That's an ugly regular expression, you should look at html5 and also jquery form validation plugin if you want better syntax. –  nikhil Oct 4 '12 at 10:46
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Everywhere you have an occurence of [a-z] character class, simply change it into [a-zA-Z]

(or specify the case insensitive flag/modifier i in your regexp)

share|improve this answer
    
Using the i flag is probably the least painful approach in this case. –  skunkfrukt Oct 4 '12 at 10:37
    
yep, indeed the flag is the simpler solution –  Fabrizio Calderan Oct 4 '12 at 10:38
    
Thanks, but wondering why Jquery just validate lowercase for eamil addresses? –  patricgh Oct 4 '12 at 10:42
    
there's no Jquery in what you posted. that is only a PCRE pattern, nothing more, nothing less :) –  Fabrizio Calderan Oct 4 '12 at 10:43
    
@patricgh: what you posted is a string, too, not a RegExp object (yet), perhaps when the constructor is called i is passed as a second argument, to make the expression case-insensitive –  Elias Van Ootegem Oct 4 '12 at 11:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.