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I want to make a member pointer as a shared_ptr, but I am not sure that the shared_ptr itself will be alive after the containing class destroyed. I tested the code below, but I am not sure that it will fit correctly at run time?

using std::cout;
using std::cin;
using std::endl;

class Widget
{
public:
    Widget()
    {
        cout<<__FUNCTION__<<"()"<<endl;
    }

    ~Widget()
    {
        cout<<__FUNCTION__<<"()"<<endl;
    }
    void display()
    {
        cout<<"the smart pointers are really smart"<<endl;
    }
private:
};

class Window
{
public:
    Window()
        :widget_(new Widget())
    {

    }

    Widget* widget()
    {
        return widget_.get();
    }


private:
    std::shared_ptr<Widget> widget_;
};

int main()
{

    Widget* outer = nullptr;
    {
        Window wind;
        outer = wind.widget();
    }

    outer->display();

    cout<<"enter"<<endl;
    cin.get();
    return 0;
}

`

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1 Answer 1

I am not sure that the shared_ptr itself will be alive after the containing class destroyed.

The shared_ptr is a member, so will be destroyed when the containing class is destroyed.

The solution is to copy the shared_ptr i.e. make widget() return shared_ptr<Widget> instead of Widget*. Then you can do:

shared_ptr<Widget> outer;
{
    Window wind;
    outer = wind.widget();
}
outer->display();

and the widget will still exist when you call display()

(Why do you want a widget to live longer than its containing window though?)

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your answer, the problem is that some class member takes pointer and delete him during its destructor, so the outer pointer will issue memory problem when it will be destructed. I thought that putting the pointer in shared_ptr will prevent the calling object from delete the pointer –  Abdulrhman Oct 6 '12 at 7:25
    
If the shared_ptr member is the last shared_ptr that owns the pointer it will delete it. –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 6 '12 at 7:51

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