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I have a child form containing a RichTextBox which is loaded with a resource file of RichText.

When the button to close the child form is clicked (using Close()), the form closes and returns to the parent form. However, the resources are not being disposed. In fact after almost wearing my mouse button out, the memory really escalated.

As a test to see if resources would eventually be released, I set up a form timer on the parent to load the child form and another in the child to call Close(). This time resources were released after about 5 or 6 open/close cycles.

Hmm.. I thought. So I changed the setup to simulate reality. This time I changed the child form timer fired event to contain button1.PerformClick(), which fires button1 pressed event, which contains the Close() statement. This time the resources were NOT released and the memory usage went up to 1 gigabyte before I aborted the test!

Why would a button event containing Close() differ from the timer event containing Close()?

OK.. Here's the code on parent form for opening the child form:-

private void showSplashScreen()
{
    // Instantiating SplashScreen
    SplashScreen splash = new SplashScreen();
    // Displaying SplashScreen
    splash.ShowDialog();
}

And Here's the code on the child form for closing the form:-

private void button1_Click( object sender, EventArgs e )
{
    Close();
}


private void timer1_Tick( object sender, EventArgs e )
{
    button1.PerformClick();
//    Close();
}

When run in this way memory usage escalates.. But if button1.PerformClick() is commented out and Close() is uncommented resources are released on a regular basis

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1  
ideally you need to show the code which launches the child form and the code in the Close methods you were testing. While there are references to the form it won't be disposed by the garbage Collector. –  Paul D'Ambra Oct 4 '12 at 11:38
    
Not clear.. post code also –  USER_NAME Oct 4 '12 at 11:52
    
Cheers for the edits! –  Zantuna Oct 4 '12 at 12:31
    
It's impossible to say from the code you've posted, but this sounds like a case where you should really be explicitly releasing the resources (rather than relying on the GC). You can implement IDisposable on the child form then explicitly call .Dispose from the parent form when the child has closed. Within the Dispose function, you should explicitly release large resources. The GC is nearly impossible to predict. –  JDB Oct 4 '12 at 14:40
    
@Cyborgx37 I understand that it's a resource releasing thing, however, I cannot see why the timer closing the child form allows for proper disposal of resources and the button click closing does not. I have even looked at the IL code and the two methods are using the same code. Any ideas? I have actually used your suggestion to get round the problem though, so thanks! –  Zantuna Oct 4 '12 at 15:05

2 Answers 2

According to the Form.Close MSDN Documentation if you use ShowDialog you need to manually dispose of your resources. Which I would do in the FormClosing event. As far as why it is working when you use a Timer, I am not sure. but usually when I use a ShowDialog and I am checking for the DialogResult, then Closing the Form from the Parent. Though using Using like you did handles it cleaner.

SplashScreen splash = new SplashScreen(); 
DialogResult dr == splash.ShowDialog(); 

if (dr == System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.OK)
{
    //Do something
}
else
{
    //do something else
}

splash.Close();
splash.Dispose();

The two conditions when a form is not disposed on Close is when (1) it is part of a multiple-document interface (MDI) application, and the form is not visible; and (2) you have displayed the form using ShowDialog. In these cases, you will need to call Dispose manually to mark all of the form's controls for garbage collection.

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+1 Nice link to relevant documentation. I didn't know it was an explicit requirement... just a best practice I've always followed. –  JDB Oct 4 '12 at 17:21
    
@ Mark Hall Although I've now resolved the issue, I thought I'd try out your solution. The GC is collecting in some cases now as you can see it reduce every so often. However, it is still climbing higher and higher as if GC can't keep up. The using() works 100% of the time. Really weird! –  Zantuna Oct 4 '12 at 17:39

OK Guys, with Cyborgx37's ideas, I have changed the calling method on the parent form as follows:-

private void showSplashScreen()
{
    // Instantiating SplashScreen.  'using' to allow proper release of resources
    using ( SplashScreen splash = new SplashScreen() ) {
        // Displaying SplashScreen
        splash.ShowDialog();
    }
}

This now releases resources correctly. however, I cannot see why the timer closing the child form allows for proper disposal of resources and the button click closing does not. I have even looked at the IL code and the two methods are using the same code. Any ideas?

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