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In C#, how does one obtain a generic enumerator from a given array?

In the code below, MyArray is an array of MyType objects. I'd like to obtain MyIEnumerator in the fashion shown, but it seems that I obtain an empty enumerator (although I've confirmed that MyArray.Length > 0).

MyType [ ]  MyArray  =  ... ;
IEnumerator<MyType>  MyIEnumerator
  =  ( MyArray.GetEnumerator() as IEnumerator<MyType> ) ;
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5 Answers 5

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Works on 2.0+:

((IEnumerable<MyType>)myArray).GetEnumerator()

Works on 3.5+ (fancy LINQy, a bit less efficient):

myArray.Cast<MyType>().GetEnumerator()   // returns IEnumerator<MyType>
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The LINQy code actually returns an enumerator for the result of the Cast method, rather than an enumerator for the array... –  Guffa Aug 13 '09 at 15:31
1  
Guffa: since enumerators provide read-only access only, it's not a big difference in terms of usage. –  Mehrdad Afshari Aug 13 '09 at 15:34

You can decide for yourself whether casting is ugly enough to warrant an extraneous library call:

int[] arr;
IEnumerator<int> Get1()
{
    return ((IEnumerable<int>)arr).GetEnumerator();
    // L_0001: ldarg.0 
    // L_0002: ldfld int32[] agree.foo::arr
    // L_0007: castclass [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1<int32>
    // L_000c: callvirt instance class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator`1<!0> [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1<int32>::GetEnumerator()
    // L_0011: stloc.0 
}
IEnumerator<int> Get2()
{
    return arr.AsEnumerable().GetEnumerator();
    // L_0001: ldarg.0 
    // L_0002: ldfld int32[] agree.foo::arr
    // L_0007: call class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1<!!0> [System.Core]System.Linq.Enumerable::AsEnumerable<int32>(class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1<!!0>)
    // L_000c: callvirt instance class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator`1<!0> [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1<int32>::GetEnumerator()
    // L_0011: stloc.0 
}

And for completeness, one should also note that the following is not correct--and will crash at runtime--because T[] chooses the non-generic IEnumerable interface for its default (i.e. non-explicit) implementation of GetEnumerator().

IEnumerator<int> NoGet()   // error - do not use
{
    return (IEnumerator<int>)arr.GetEnumerator();
    // L_0001: ldarg.0 
    // L_0002: ldfld int32[] agree.foo::arr
    // L_0007: callvirt instance class [mscorlib]System.Collections.IEnumerator [mscorlib]System.Array::GetEnumerator()
    // L_000c: castclass [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator`1<int32>
    // L_0011: stloc.0 
}

The mystery is, why doesn't SZGenericArrayEnumerator<T> inherit from SZArrayEnumerator--an internal class which is currently marked 'sealed'--since this would allow the (covariant) generic enumerator to be returned by default?

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Since I don't like casting, a little update:

your_array.AsEnumerable().GetEnumerator();
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YourArray.OfType().GetEnumerator();

may perform a little better, since it only has to check the type, and not cast.

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You have to explicitly specify the type when using OfType<..type..>() - at least in my case of double[][] –  M. Mimpen Jul 4 at 8:34

To Make it as clean as possible I like to let the compiler do all of the work. There are no casts (so its actually type-safe). No third party Libraries (System.Linq) are used (No runtime overhead).

    public static IEnumerable<T> GetEnumerable<T>(this T[] arr)
    {
        return arr;
    }

// And to use the code:

    String[] arr = new String[0];
    arr.GetEnumerable().GetEnumerator()

This takes advantage of some compiler magic that keeps everything clean.

The other point to note is that this is the only answer that will actually do compile-time checking, which means if the type of "arr" changes, then your code will compile, but have a runtime bug. Mine will not compile and there for I have less chance of shipping a bug in my code. As it would signal to me that I am using the wrong type.

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