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my problem is that i would like to organize my code so i can have a debug and release version of the same methods, and i can have multiple definitions of the same methods for different targeted platforms.

Basically the core of the problem is the same for both, i need to have the same signature but with different definitions associated.

What is the best way to organize my code on the filesystem and for compilation and production so i can keep this clean and separated ?

Thanks.

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2  
Normally, this is handled by having #ifdef guards around the relevant code. If this would result in your code looking totally unreadable, you could always have a 'wrapper' function containing only these guard checks around calls to your 'actual' (differently named) functions. –  jam Oct 4 '12 at 12:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suggest you to intervene at source level and not on header files (just to be sure to keep same interfaces), something like:

//Foo.h

class Foo{
  void methodA();
  void methodB();
};


//Foo.cpp

// common method
Foo::methodA() { }

#ifdef _DEBUG_
  Foo::methodB() { }
#elif _PLATFORM_BAR_
  Foo::methodB() { }
#else
  Foo:methodB() { }
#endif

If, instead, you want to keep everything separated, you will have to work on a higher lever, the preprocessor is not enough to conditionally include a .cpp file instead that another. You will have to work with the makefile or whatever you use.

Another choice could be the one of having source files that simply disappear when not on specific platform, eg:

//Foo.h

class Foo{
  void methodA();
  void methodB();
};

//FooCommon.cpp

void Foo::methodA() { }

//FooDebug.cpp
#ifdef _DEBUG_H
void Foo::methodB() { }
#endif

//FooRelease.cpp
#ifndef _DEBUG_H_
void Foo::methodB() { }
#endif
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this is really really verbose, even considering this trivial example, but i think i can remove the methods definitions and use several #include to keep the code much more clean: what about this ? –  user1717079 Oct 4 '12 at 12:22
    
Problem is that the inclusion is meant to work on header files to show definitions but source code is always included inside the compiler task (it actually depends on your compiler). So you will have many .cpp files with the implementations and you will have to #ifdef them –  Jack Oct 4 '12 at 12:23
// #define DEBUG   -  we're making a non debug version


#ifdef DEBUG

// function definition for debug

#else

// function definition for release

#endif

The same can be done for different operating systems. There's of course the problem of recompilating all of it, which can be a pain in the ass in C++.

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you are assuming that multiple definitions that are related to the same signature are in the same source file, am i correct about this ? My source code will easily become unreadable and really huge. I would like to split everything by target so i can keep things separated –  user1717079 Oct 4 '12 at 12:19

If your compiler allows, you can try keeping the source files for each version in a separate subfolder (eg #include "x86_d/test.h") then using global macro definitions to control the flow:

#define MODE_DEBUG

#ifdef MODE_DEBUG
#include "x86dbg/test.h"
#else
#include "x86rel/test.h"
#endif

You can also use a similar structure for member function definitions, so that you can have two different definitions in the same file. Many compilers also use their own defines for global macros as well, so instead of #define MODE_DEBUG above, you might be able to use something like #ifdef _CPP_RELEASE or maybe even define one through a compiler flag.

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