Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
<?php

$forks = 2;

switch ($forks) {
    case 1:
        $ob_file = fopen('case1.txt','w');
        function ob_file_callback($buffer)
{
        global $ob_file;
        fwrite($ob_file,$buffer);
}
        ob_start('ob_file_callback');
        echo $ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
        ob_end_flush();

        header("LOCATION: case1.php");

    case 2:
    $ob_file = fopen('case2.txt','w');
function ob_file_callback($buffer)
{
  global $ob_file;
  fwrite($ob_file,$buffer);
}
ob_start('ob_file_callback');
echo $ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
ob_end_flush();
    ;
     header("LOCATION: case2.php");
        }


?>
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>

If I choose $forks = 1, it write to case2.txt which is nuts but it does. Not only does it fail to redirect LOCATION, but it won't even show the default page. It claims there's an issue on the header location because headers have already been sent, which is surreal. Then, even though I'm not asking it to redeclare ob_file_callback because it's in case 2 and I've opted for case 1, it claims cannot redeclare ob_file_callback on the ob_file_callback that's sitting inside case 2.

If I choose $forks = 2, it doesn't write into any file whatsoever and just claims it can't modify header information so it's another header relocation fail, which is also stupid. It does however give me the default page, but that just confuses me further.

My problem with fwrite, ob_start or ob_end_flush or whatever's doing the writing to file, is that it'll only write it once. Either that or it's erasing the file everytime it opens it, so the resulting issue is that when forks 1 does indeed write to case2.txt, it's always only ever 1 string sitting there.


First round of corrections:

    <?php

     function ob_file_callback($buffer)
{
     global $ob_file;
     fwrite($ob_file,$buffer);
}
$forks = 1;
switch ($forks) {
    case 1:
     $ob_file = fopen('case1.txt','w');

     ob_start('ob_file_callback');
     echo $ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
     ob_end_flush();
     header("LOCATION: case1.php");
     exit;
break;

   case 2:
    $ob_file = fopen('case2.txt','w');
    ob_start('ob_file_callback');
    echo $ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
    ob_end_flush();
    header("LOCATION: case2.php");
        }
    exit
?>
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You have no break statement in your first case branch dealing with the "1". You do send a redirection header, but that is just a header sent to the client. it does not terminate execution!

Using the feedback from the discussion in the comments, I try to make things a little clearer:

<?php

// writes a given string $buffer into a file handle spcified by the global $file
function ob_file_callback($buffer) 
{ 
    global $ob_file;
    fwrite($ob_file,$buffer); 
    return $buffer;
}

// main(): 

// #####
$forks = 1; // testing only !!
//$forks = 2; // testing only !!
// #####

global $ob_file = FALSE;
switch ($forks) {
    case 1:
        $ob_file = fopen('case1.txt','w');    
        ob_start('ob_file_callback');
        echo sprintf('ip = %s',$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);
        ob_end_flush();
        fclose($ob_file);
        header("Location: case1.php");
        break;
    case 2:
        $ob_file = fopen('case2.txt','w');
        ob_start('ob_file_callback');
        echo sprintf('ip = %s',$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);
        ob_end_flush();
        fclose($ob_file);
        header("Location: case2.php");
} // switch

?>

I have not tested that code (so there might be some syntax glitch...). I just want to note down a suggestion of how to get this working...

share|improve this answer
    
Well that may have stopped it from writing to case2.txt, and it now seems to be writing to case1.txt, but there are many other more inexplicable issues going on. Also, i don't know what you mean when you say I'm sending the header but not terminating. –  A Moose Oct 4 '12 at 12:43
    
Not terminating means: the script goes on in execution. It does not simply stop because you call the header() function. Why should it? –  arkascha Oct 4 '12 at 12:44
    
Why do you declare that function ob_file_callback() twice? I am surprised that is possible at all. You certainly want to change that and put the function implementation outside the switch statement. Put it at the start of the script. –  arkascha Oct 4 '12 at 12:46
    
OK, I've extracted the function to outside the cases, but it still won't write to case1.txt, and both header relocations fail. Is exit not good enough? Above in the first round of corrections are the changes. –  A Moose Oct 4 '12 at 13:02
    
Exit terminates, yes. but it is not required here, the switch is fine (expect the strange indentation of the "}"). That global variable also is very ugly, but whatever... –  arkascha Oct 4 '12 at 13:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.