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I have three kind of numerical ranges which are defined within some interval like:
1. countinous range (any value within specified interval)
2. periodical sequence (sequence start, step and steps count are specified)
3. a set of exact values (like 1, 3, 7 etc)

I need to union/intersect them (from 2 to N of different types) and get optimized results. Obviously, intersection of above will return result of one of types above and unioning them will result in 1 to M ranges of types above.
Example 1:
1st range is defined as continous range from 5 to 11 and 2nd is periodical sequence from 2 to 18 with step 2 (thus, 8 steps).
Intersection will return a periodic sequence from 6 to 10 with step 2.
Union will return three results: a periodic sequence from 2 to 4 with step 2, a continous range from 5 to 11 and a periodic sequence from 12 to 18 with step 2.
Example 2:
1st range is defined as periodic sequence 0 to 10 with step 2 and 2nd is periodical sequence from 1 to 7 with step 2 (thus, 3 steps).
Intersection will return null as they dont intersect.
Union will return two results: a periodic sequence from 1 to 8 with step 1 (note: optimized result) and an exact value of 10.
Hope i didnt make mistakes :)
Well, these operations over these kind of sequences shouldnt be too complex and i hope there is a library for things like here. Please advice any (will use in C#.NET).
Thanks!

UPDATE
Answering to "how do i think i use the library". All three types above can be easily defined in programming language as:
1. Contionous: { decimal Start; decimal End; } where Start is the beginning of range and End is the end
2. Periodical: { decimal Start; decimal Step; int Count; } where Start is the beginning of sequence, Step is increment and Count is steps count
3. Set of exact numbers: { decimal[] Values; } where Values is array of some decimals.

When i make an intersection of any two ranges of any types listed above then i'll certainly get result of one of that types, e.g. "continous" and "periodical" ranges intersection will result to "periodical", "cont." and "set of exact" will result to set of exact, "cont." and "exact" will return exacts as well. Intersection of the same types will return result of the input types.
Union of 2 ranges is a bit more complex but will anyway return 2 to 3 ranges defined in types above as well.
Having intersection/unioning functions i'll always be able run it over 2 to N ranges and will get results in the input types terms.

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closed as too localized by tomfanning, Blam, LittleBobbyTables, Lucifer, Jason Sturges Oct 8 '12 at 14:20

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I think you'll get answers from naive to extremely complex. Could you provide a small example of how you want to use this library? –  Adriano Repetti Oct 4 '12 at 13:15
    
Hi Adriano! Yes, it's possible and i've already written most of the library, but would like to use some existing good solution. In a couple of minutes will add an answer on your question as an update to the post. –  LINQ2Vodka Oct 4 '12 at 13:22
    
@Adriano: it's done –  LINQ2Vodka Oct 4 '12 at 13:35
2  
@tomfanning: in my opinion, this task of intersection/union numbers sets is a common problem enough. –  LINQ2Vodka Oct 4 '12 at 13:39
1  
While it is not a C# library, nor answer the full requirement of your question (thus it is not an answer, but a comment) - you might want to have a look on the Data Structure interval tree –  amit Oct 4 '12 at 13:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, following other answers before: I don't believe there's a standard library for this: it looks very much as a special case.

Second, the problem / requirement is not stated sufficiently clear. I'll follow the problem introduction and refer to the 3 different types as "set", "periodic", "continuous".

Consider two sets, {1,4,5,6} and {4,5,6,8}. Their intersection is {4,5,6}. Do we have to label that as "periodic" because that description fits the case, or as "set" because it is an intersection of sets?

From this, more in general, do we need to change a "set"-label into "periodic" as soon as its contents IS periodic? After all, a "periodic" is a special case of a "set".

Likewise, consider the union of a "periodic" {4,6,8} and a set {10,15,16}. Do we have to define the result as a periodic {4,6,8,10} plus a periodic{15,16} or rather as one set with all the values, or yet another variety?

And how about the degenerate cases: is {3} a "set", a "periodic", or even a "continuous"? What type is the intersection of "continuous"{1-4} and "set"{4,7,8}? and the intersection of continuous{1-4} and continous{4-7}?

And so forth: it has to be clear how any result - from union and/or intersection - must be labeled/described, whether - for instance - the intersection or union of two discrete types (non-continuous) is always ONE type (usually a set, possibly a periodic), or rather always a series of periodics, or ...

Third, assuming that the above questions have been taken care of, I believe you may approach the implementation with the following guidelines:

  • consider only two "types", namely "continuous" and "set". The "periodic" is just a special form of a "set", and at any moment we can, if and where appropriate, label a "set" as "periodic".

  • define a common baseclass, and use appropriate derived (overloaded) methods for union, intersection, and whatever you may need, to produce - for instance - a list(of baseType) as result.

The case-by-case implementations are basically quite simple - assuming that my introductory questions have been answered. Wherever the initial problem appears somewhat "difficult", it is only because the problem and specifications are not yet very well defined.

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That all sounds pretty custom - so I don't think you'll find a library that does all of that off the peg - but there's nothing too hard there.

I'll start you off. Works fine for the first example, but the method Range.ConstructAppropriate will need to be particularly complicated to return "a periodic sequence from 2 to 4 with step 2, a continous range from 5 to 11 and a periodic sequence from 12 to 18 with step 2" from the set { 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 2, 4, 12, 14, 16, 18 } which results from the union of the two sets in example 1.

Also (after going to the trouble of wiring all that code) I note from the comments you have a requirement for non-integer numbers. This complicates things. I imagine you could come up with a creative way to apply this pattern.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Example 1:
        // 1st range is defined as continous range from 5 to 11 and 2nd is periodical sequence from 2 to 18 with step 2 (thus, 8 steps).
        // Intersection will return a periodic sequence from 6 to 10 with step 2.example 1

        ContinuousRange ex1_r1 = new ContinuousRange(5, 11);
        PeriodicRange ex1_r2 = new PeriodicRange(2, 2, 8);

        IEnumerable<int> ex1_intersection = ex1_r1.Values.Intersect(ex1_r2.Values);
        IList<Range> ex1_intersection_results = Range.ConstructAppropriate(ex1_intersection);
    }
}

abstract class Range
{
    public abstract IEnumerable<int> Values { get; }

    public static IList<Range> ConstructAppropriate(IEnumerable<int> values)
    {
        var results = new List<Range>();

        results.Add(ContinuousRange.ConstructFrom(values));
        results.Add(PeriodicRange.ConstructFrom(values));

        if (!results.Any(r => r != null))
            results.Add(Points.ConstructFrom(values));

        return results.Where(r => r != null).ToList();
    }
}

class ContinuousRange : Range
{
    int start, endInclusive;

    public ContinuousRange(int start, int endInclusive)
    {
        this.start = start;
        this.endInclusive = endInclusive;
    }

    public override IEnumerable<int> Values
    {
        get
        {
            return Enumerable.Range(start, endInclusive - start + 1);
        }
    }

    internal static ContinuousRange ConstructFrom(IEnumerable<int> values)
    {
        int[] sorted = values.ToArray();
        if (sorted.Length <= 1)
            return null;

        for (int i = 1; i < sorted.Length; i++)
        {
            if (sorted[i] - sorted[i - 1] != 1)
                return null;
        }

        return new ContinuousRange(sorted.First(), sorted.Last());
    }
}

class PeriodicRange : Range
{
    int start, step, count;

    public PeriodicRange(int start, int step, int count)
    {
        this.start = start;
        this.step = step;
        this.count = count;
    }

    public override IEnumerable<int> Values
    {
        get
        {
            var nums = new List<int>();
            int i = start;
            int cur = 0;

            while (cur <= count)
            {
                nums.Add(i);
                i += step;
                cur++;
            }

            return nums;
        }
    }

    internal static Range ConstructFrom(IEnumerable<int> values)
    {
        // check the difference is the same between all values

        if (values.Count() < 2)
            return null;

        var sorted = values.OrderBy(a => a).ToArray();

        int step = sorted[1] - sorted[0];

        for (int i = 2; i < sorted.Length; i++)
        {
            if (step != sorted[i] - sorted[i - 1])
                return null;
        }

        return new PeriodicRange(sorted[0], step, sorted.Length - 1);
    }
}

class Points : Range
{
    int[] nums;

    public Points(params int[] nums)
    {
        this.nums = nums;
    }

    public override IEnumerable<int> Values
    {
        get { return nums; }
    }

    internal static Range ConstructFrom(IEnumerable<int> values)
    {
        return new Points(values.ToArray());
    }
}
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1  
{5,6,7,8,9,10,11} is NOT continous range from 5 to 11. The continious range [5,11] has infinite elements, with double numbers, it is around 2^53 different numbers, if I am not mistaken. –  amit Oct 4 '12 at 13:27
    
Actually it is a continuous range of integers from 5 to 11. My answer explicitly states that further work would be required for non-integer support. –  tomfanning Oct 4 '12 at 13:29
    
@amit That is not clear in your question statement. You use the term "numeric". If you meant the .NET type Decimal then be clear. There is no .NET type of [x,y] Decimal. –  Blam Oct 4 '12 at 13:33
    
@Blam: I don't understand why you are arguing, the asker of the question explicitly said (in comment to your answer) I am right. The question is NOT about integers. –  amit Oct 4 '12 at 13:38

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