Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Why does Java prohibit static fields in inner classes?

I was going through the specification and got that it is not possible to have the static member in the inner class which is not final compile time constant .

class HasStatic {
    static int j = 100;
}
class myInnerClassTest {
    class Inner extends HasStatic {
        static final int x = 3;  // OK: compile-time constant
        static int y = 4;  // Compile-time error: an inner class
    }
    static class NestedButNotInner{
        static int z = 5;    // OK: not an inner class
    }
    interface NeverInner {}   // Interfaces are never inner
}

Whereas i got from the here that it can inherit the static member from its owner class . But why it shouldn't . what OOPs Prinicipal it hurts .

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by kleopatra, Bobrovsky, Thilo, HaskellElephant, Eddy Oct 6 '12 at 19:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Inner classes cannot have a static initialisation blocks (exactly why I don't know). Primitives known at compile time can have a default value without a static initialisation block. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 4 '12 at 12:27
3  
Non-static nested classes only really exist within an instance of the outer class. As a result, there's no real "static" context in such a class, so static members (other than constants) don't make sense. –  Wormbo Oct 4 '12 at 12:42
    
@Wormbo As I already wrote in the other comment, inner classes, put simply, are nothing else than normal classes with implicit reference to outer class. Why should it prevent them from having a static variable shared by all instances? –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 13:51
1  
It's a conceptual thing. By design they are associated with an instance of the outer class and are not supposed to be used in a different way. If you want static members, you can always make the nested class static. Or you could just move the static parts to a separate class. –  Wormbo Oct 4 '12 at 20:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your class myInnerClassTest isn't declared as static. So what would that exactly mean for it to have a static field ?

Would it be

  • the same for all instances whatever the enclosing instance ?
  • the same for all instances of this inner class having the same enclosing instance ?

At first sight most programmers would probably think it's the first case, while the encapsulation logic of the (non static) inner class should probably lead to the second choice. Either case (or both with different modifiers) would need a new definition of static which probably wasn't seen as necessary. And in either case programmers would be confused about the exact meaning.

From the specification :

An inner class is a nested class that is not explicitly or implicitly declared static.

Inner classes include local (§14.3), anonymous (§15.9.5) and non-static member classes (§8.5).

Inner classes may not declare static initializers (§8.7) or member interfaces, or a compile-time error occurs.

Inner classes may not declare static members, unless they are constant variables (§4.12.4), or a compile-time error occurs.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't get this point: "Would it be the same for all instances whatever the enclosing class" . There can be (and is) just one enclosing class... The statics in inner class could "share" the same area as enclosing class, but the visibility would be different. –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 12:38
1  
@AdamDyga you instantiate an inner class with outer.new Inner(); –  Raffaele Oct 4 '12 at 12:40
    
@Raffaele Inner has always exactly one and the same enclosing class. I still don't see any problem with static in inner class –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 12:44
    
@AdamDyga - If your inner class isn't static nested, it doesn't make sense to have a static member in a non static class (your inner class) of an enclosing instance. –  wulfgar.pro Oct 4 '12 at 12:54
2  
The problem is that instances of inner classes of two different enclosing instances should be considered as in different worlds, a little like instances of the "same" class in two different jvm are different (see the comment of Wormbo at the top for a different way to say the same thing). You make a non static inner class because you want to encapsulate and dedicate your class to an enclosing instance, so they shouldn't share variables. Of course your choice would make sense too, that's why I think this would be confusing. –  dystroy Oct 4 '12 at 14:42

According to JLS: -

8.1.3 Inner Classes and Enclosing Instances

An inner class is a nested class that is not explicitly or implicitly declared static. Inner classes may not declare static initializers (§8.7) or member interfaces. Inner classes may not declare static members, unless they are compile-time constant fields (§15.28).

Any local variable, formal method parameter or exception handler parameter used but not declared in an inner class must be declared final. Any local variable, used but not declared in an inner class must be definitely assigned (§16) before the body of the inner class.

Apart from these two things, which I found important.. There are many more that you can get it from there.. There is a huge explanation about inner classes, anonymous inner classes, and nested classes..

UPDATED EXPLANATION : -

Just think about it. Static block is executed during class initialization, and you cannot initialize a non-static inner class without having an instance of the enclosing class, that's the reason.

Inner classes are associated with the instance of the enclosing class.. They are like other instance attributes of the enclosing class.. Now, it doesn't make sense to embed a static field in a non-static context.. However, if you declare them as Compile Time Constants they would be allowed.

NOTE: - static final Object = null is not compile time constants.. So, you can't have them inside your inner class

On the other hand, had your inner class been static, that is actually a nested class, then you can declare your field static, as they will still be associated with the class, so you can access them even before enclosing class in instantiated..

I hope that makes sense..

UPDATE 2 : -

public class A {
   class B {
        static int x = 0;
   }
}

In the above code, static variable x will be common for every instance of class B.. Also, each instance of class A, will have it's own copy of class B (Since JVM will have to load class B every time an instance of A is created)..

So, static variable x could not have been shared between every instance of class A, unless it is a compile time constants.. (To make it more straight foreward: - You can do - B.x if you see B as outer class.. But class B is itself different for each instance of class A. So, B.x will be different for each instance of class A.. So, static variable x is not actually shared between different instances of class A.. Doesn't make sense for a static variable.)

I hope now, that makes sense..

share|improve this answer
1  
Your answer only shows what the specificaiton says. But the question is why such restriction was actually put in the specs? There must be a reason. –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 12:48
    
@AdamDyga check my answer. –  Amit Deshpande Oct 4 '12 at 12:50
    
@AdamDyga.. Now I have added an explanation.. I think that would be clear now.. :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 4 '12 at 12:59
    
"Static block is executed during class initialization, and you cannot initialize a non-static inner class without having an instance of the enclosing class, that's the reason. " This is still not convincing me. There must be a point where Outer$Inner.class (the file) is loaded by JVM (probably right after Outer.class file). And this is the place when the static initialization could be done - right after static initialization of Outer. Static initialization of Outer also occurs when there are no instances created (yet). –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 13:06
    
@AdamDyga.. See UPDATE 2.. I think that will explain better.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 4 '12 at 13:10

Because the inner class in intimately associated to the top level class you must have an instance of the outer class to create an inner via

Outer o = new Outer();
Inner i = o.new Inner();

This is therefore associated with an instance and not a class.

share|improve this answer
    
So why can you still use Inner.class and do with it anything you can do with Outer.class ? –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 13:01
    
You are free to access the ".class" static once the inner class has been instantiated. The whole point of the inner class defined above is that its attached to the outer class. Making the inner class static makes it a top-level class and it will allow you to create a non-final static member –  Dave Whittingham Oct 4 '12 at 14:43
    
You may get some more info from link –  Dave Whittingham Oct 4 '12 at 14:44

As you know, inner class can inherit static member from its owner class.

class HasStatic {
    static int j = 100;
}
class myInnerClassTest {
    class Inner extends HasStatic {
    }      
    public static void main(String[] args){
        System.out.println(Inner.j);
    }
}

And it prints "100".

share|improve this answer

All the restrictions are documented in JLS #8.1.3. Inner Classes and Enclosing Instances

Because static declarations is associated with Class if you declare it inside inner class it will get associated with instance rather than class.

innerclass

Non static inner classes are members of Object. And for members initialization only happens when instance of object is created. If static variables were allowed then initialization would have happened before creation of instance.

That is why there are separate non-static and static inner classes.

You always need outer class instance to access inner class Outer.Inner only exception is static inner class for which there are no constraints which are applicable to non-static inner classes.

static class Inner {
    static final int x = 3; // OK: compile-time constant
    static int y = 4;// OK
    static class NestedButNotInner {// OK

    }

    interface NeverInner {// OK
    };
}

However constants are permitted and it is documented in JLS

share|improve this answer
    
Inner class, all in all, has also it's own class (Outer$Inner). I still don't see why the instances can't have and share a static field. –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 12:53
    
@AdamDyga Though it has a class it is a non static member and for non static members initialization occurs only when Class instance is created. Declaration of static variables would have created initialization before. That is why there are two separate inner class static and non-static. –  Amit Deshpande Oct 4 '12 at 13:25
    
"Declaration of static variables would have created initialization before." - doesn't the same happen with normal classes? Static initialization takes place before any instance is created. What's more you don't even have to create any instance, it's enough if you just "touch" the class (eg. call a static method). –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 13:56
    
Yes that the point as you have explained. Now if you touch non-static inner class initialization will happen which should not. You should treat inner class as Object instance variable and then imagine the same now you are violating the rule. –  Amit Deshpande Oct 4 '12 at 14:01
    
"Now if you touch non-static inner class initialization will happen which should not." But why not? :) I can invoke static initialization of normal class without creating an instance, why can't it be done with inner classes? Wouldn't it be enough if we defined that static initialization of inner class always takes place right after static initialization of outer class? I don't want to troll here and I know there must be some good reason Java designers did it this way, but I just didn't see any good justification (so far). –  Adam Dyga Oct 4 '12 at 14:15

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.