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I have an issue

I have two epoch time like

endTime
1349351477198


startTime
1349351468952

I am getting the correct time format while checking it on http://www.epochconverter.com/

like

GMT: Thu, 04 Oct 2012 11:51:08 GMT

Thu, 04 Oct 2012 11:51:17 GMT

For the same epoch when i am trying to convert in time using python like (I am not taking care of date )

>>> start_time = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.gmtime(1349351468952))
>>> print start_time 
20:29:12
>>> start_time = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.gmtime(1349351477198))
>>> print start_time 
22:46:38

I am getting unexpected result as above please help me out .

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I get '12:39:55' for gmtime() and '14:39:59' for localtime(), and this is what I would expect. Can you please tell us what do you actually expect? –  nagylzs Oct 4 '12 at 12:41
    
start_time should 11:51:08 (GMT) and end_time 11:51:17 (GMT) –  user1667633 Oct 4 '12 at 12:43
    
When you get wrong results you should check the whole data you receive. Next time print also day/month and year, and you will see that an year of about 44k is not normal... –  Bakuriu Oct 4 '12 at 12:50
    
@Bakuriu You are right i also found the same result that you are talking about i think their is some problem in my code because for the same epoch i am getting the right value from epochconverter.com –  user1667633 Oct 4 '12 at 12:57
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I guess your problem is that your numbers are not in seconds but in milliseconds. Try this instead:

time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.gmtime(1349351477.198))
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If it is in millisecond then why i am getting the correct result from epochtimeconverter.com –  user1667633 Oct 4 '12 at 13:01
    
When you open epochconverter.com it has this number by default: 1349356005 or something similar. That is about 1.3 billion. Your numbers are much higher. Where did you get those numbers from? It doesn't matter what that site says anyway. You can roughly calculate the number of seconds since epoch. It was about 42 years ago, and clearly 1349356005 / 60.0 / 60.0 / 24.0 / 365.0 = 42.78. And since gmttime() expects "number of SECONDS elapsed", you must give that to it. Not milliseconds. –  nagylzs Oct 4 '12 at 13:10
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