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In my code, I use a synchronized block on the resource set inside another synchronized block on the same resource. This did not cause me any problems so far, but I'm curious: what are the consequences if any? Will these synchronized blocks conflict with each other?

Set<myClass> set = Collections.synchronizedSet(new HashSet<myClass>());

synchronized(set) {
    set.add(new myClass());
    ...
    writeSetContentsToFile();
}

public synchronized void writeSetContentsToFile() {
    synchronized(set) {
        ...
    }
}

The set is accessed and changed continously by other threads. I synchronized writeSetContentsToFile(), so there won't be any conflicts at the file resource, and again, there is a synchronized block inside writeSetContentsToFile(), to make sure no changes are made to the set while iterating over it.

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1  
Syncrhonized blocks are reentrant, so on the same thread, it should not cause any problem. –  Juan Alberto López Cavallotti Oct 4 '12 at 13:06
1  
@Daniel it may be that doing synchronized twice is redundant in writeSetContentsToFile(), unless set isn't a member of type owning the method. And, usually, you should take the most fine-grained lock you have, which here seems to be set, to improve throughput. –  Victor Sorokin Oct 4 '12 at 13:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This did not cause me any problems so far, but I'm curious: what are the consequences if any?

In some ways you answered your own question, it works but its confusing. Its best to simplify the code if you can. You would need to look at the rest of the code to determine whether this is possible.

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It's my understanding that Java synchronization is thread-specific, so that won't ever be a problem. What exactly is confusing about the code? –  João Mendes Oct 4 '12 at 13:03
2  
You have four different places where synchronisation occurs when the minimum is one. I suspect not all of them are needed. If you use a concurrent collection you might be able to avoid them all. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 4 '12 at 13:08
    
The set is accessed and changed continously by other threads. I synchronized writeSetContentsToFile(), so there won't be any conflicts at the file resource, and again, there is a synchronized block inside writeSetContentsToFile(), to make sure no changes are made to the set while iterating over it. –  Daniel Szalay Oct 4 '12 at 13:14

There are two locks here, the one on this, and the one on set. If two threads lock them in different orders, BANG. Deadlock. You haven't shown all your code, so this might not be possible, but what about when someone changes the class to add a new method?

As Peter Lawrey says, you should try to simplify this code.

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If your operation expressed in

synchronized(set) {
    set.add(new myClass());
    ...
    writeSetContentsToFile();
}

is atomic, encapsulate it in separate class, say, ThreadSafeFileStorableSet under dedicated method, say, synchronized writeContentsToFile().

For example:

class ThreadSafeFileStorableSet {
    private final Set set;

    ThreadSafeFileStorableSet(Set set) {
        this.set = set;
    }

    synchronized void writeSetContentsToFile() {
        // 
    }

    synchronized void addElements(Object[] elems) {
        // 
    }

    private void doWrite() {
        // use instance set
    }
}

Make all other non-private methods of ThreadSafeFileStorableSet class synchronized too, so all operations will be atomic to each other. Then you won't need synchronized (set) snippets inside this class.

This will simplify your code, but may make concurrency level worse. But I don't have enough information to advise on how much worse it could become from reading your code.

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