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I have the following code block:

        Label[] TagLabels = { labelCITag, labelCATag, labelCAuthTag, labelCLTag, labelCCTag, labelOther1Tag, labelOther2Tag, labelOther3Tag, labelOther4Tag };
        TextBox[] TagTextBoxes = { textBoxCITag, textBoxCATag, textBoxCAuthTag, textBoxCLTag, textBoxCCTag, textBoxOther1Tag, textBoxOther2Tag, textBoxOther3Tag, textBoxOther4Tag };
        for (int i = 0; i < TagTextBoxes.Length; i++)
        {
            if (TagTextBoxes[i].Text == "")
                TagLabels[i].Visible = false;
            else
                TagLabels[i].Visible = true;
        }

The code iterates through TextBoxes and makes the Labels visible/invisible based on whether the TextBoxes are empty or not.

In the debugging window I can see that the code executes the else condition, but when I move the mouse over the property it still shows as false and it is confirmed in the immediate window.

Can anyone tell me why is this crazy thing happening?

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enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Really obvious comment but are you hitting F11 during your debug to move down to the brace? Because the code won't execute until the debugger has passed the line! –  JMK Oct 4 '12 at 13:23
    
Of course I am using F11 to execute it line by line and after the statement in the else condition executes(moves to }, I can see its still false. Actually things were not looking as expected in GUI that's why I debugged it line by line. –  Akshay J Oct 4 '12 at 13:27
    
When are you executing it? Needs to be after the .designer code has executed. I'd usually put something like this after InitializeComponents call in in the forms constructor. Or in FormShow –  Tony Hopkinson Oct 4 '12 at 13:35
    
Check the value of i. Also, you have the direct reference to the actual control names, so ensure that you're debugging the expected control, by inspecting the control by its name as well (e.g. labelCITag). –  code4life Oct 4 '12 at 13:38
    
you can just replace the if block with TagLabels[i].Visible = TagTextBoxes[i].Text = "". Using an "if true set true else set false" is just redundant. –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 13:40

3 Answers 3

If you use Reflector to look at the implementation of Control.Visible, its getter does this:

internal virtual bool GetVisibleCore()
{
    if (!this.GetState(0x2))
    {
        return false;
    }
    return ((this.ParentInternal == null) || this.ParentInternal.GetVisibleCore());
}

However, its setter is much more complicated; the getter and setter are not symmetrical.

It is possible that the .Visible property doesn't simply return the last value that you set it to, but rather the control's current state. Since you changed its property while debugging, you have not yet allowed the controls to update, so they are not currently visible.

If you allow the code to run so that the window is updated, the state should then become Visible.

You could also test this by putting Application.DoEvents() immediately after changing the Visible property (but don't use Application.DoEvents() for anything other than testing - it's monstrous.)

share|improve this answer

Try this:

Label[] TagLabels = { labelCITag, labelCATag, labelCAuthTag, labelCLTag, labelCCTag, labelOther1Tag, labelOther2Tag, labelOther3Tag, labelOther4Tag };
TextBox[] TagTextBoxes = { textBoxCITag, textBoxCATag, textBoxCAuthTag, textBoxCLTag, textBoxCCTag, textBoxOther1Tag, textBoxOther2Tag, textBoxOther3Tag, textBoxOther4Tag };
for (int i = 0; i < TagTextBoxes.Length; i++)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(TagTextBoxes[i].Text))
        TagLabels[i].Visible = false;
    else
        TagLabels[i].Visible = true;
}

I have recreated your code with this minor change as shown below and it works for me:

SS

share|improve this answer
    
I can see its working fine for you, the question is why its not working for me. See my screenshots in the question. –  Akshay J Oct 4 '12 at 13:33
    
Have you tried string.IsNullOrEmpty(TagTextBoxes[i].Text) instead? Maybe your textbox contains a null string, as opposed to an empty string! –  JMK Oct 4 '12 at 13:35
    
Like I said the statement executes(becomes yellow and moves to the next line) and still shows as false which is same as in immediate window. –  Akshay J Oct 4 '12 at 13:39
1  
@AkshayJ When you don't debug it and just let it run does it actually not work? If it still works in the end then Matthew's answer is probably the explanation. –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 13:41
    
Yeah if it works normally I think Matthew's answer has nailed it. –  JMK Oct 4 '12 at 13:43

If a control is set to visible, it will still be invisible if its parent is not visible. So if it's on a form you haven't shown yet, they won't show visible until the form is shown.

share|improve this answer
    
Form is already visible. –  Akshay J Oct 4 '12 at 13:34

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