Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two C files 1.c and 2.c

2.c

#include<stdio.h>

static int i;

int func1(){
   i = 5;
   printf("\nfile2 : %d\n",i);
   return 0;
}

1.c

#include<stdio.h>

int i;

int main()
{
   func1();
   printf("\nFile1: %d\n",i);
   return 0;
}

I compiled both the files with "gcc 1.c 2.c -o st" The output is as follows

file2 : 5

File2: 0

I was expecting output as follows

file2 : 5

File2: 5

I want to access the same variable "i" in both the files. How can I do it?

share|improve this question
    
You can't have two main() functions. –  pmg Oct 4 '12 at 13:34
    
sorry my mistake. I edited the question –  Surjya Narayana Padhi Oct 4 '12 at 13:35
    
Define your variable in one cpp file and in another use keyword extern. –  tommyk Oct 4 '12 at 13:35
    
I need to be C code –  Surjya Narayana Padhi Oct 4 '12 at 13:36
    
The question doesn't make any sense. The whole point of declaring a file scope variable as static is to prevent it from getting accessed by other files. What you should have asked yourself is "why am I using static in my code, when I have no idea about the meaning of the keyword" –  Lundin Oct 4 '12 at 13:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Choose one file which will store the variable. Do not use static. The whole point of static is to keep the variable private and untouchable by other modules.

In all other files, use the extern keyword to reference the variable:

extern int i;
share|improve this answer
    
I changed the declaration in 1.c to "extern int i;" /tmp/cc6ZXXhV.o: In function main': 1.c:(.text+0x10): undefined reference to i' collect2: ld returned 1 exit status –  Surjya Narayana Padhi Oct 4 '12 at 13:38
    
Remove 'static'. –  Mike Weller Oct 4 '12 at 13:39
    
If I remove static would it will be a global variable. It won't be static anymore. –  Surjya Narayana Padhi Oct 4 '12 at 13:43
1  
static variables cannot be referenced from outside their compilation unit. You need a global variable. –  Mike Weller Oct 4 '12 at 13:44
    
The only way to do what you want is a global variable. That is the point of global : It's the same for every module. –  hirschhornsalz Oct 4 '12 at 13:45

static variables can only be accessed within a single translation unit, which means that only code in the file that it is defined in can see it. The Wikipedia Article has a nice explanation. In this situation, to share the variable across multiple files you would use extern.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried using extern keyword in file 1.c. But its throwing compilation error. It does not recognize the external variable "i" –  Surjya Narayana Padhi Oct 4 '12 at 13:41

There is never a reason to access a static variable in another file. You don't seem to know why you are using the static keyword. There are two ways to declare variables at file scope (outside functions).

Global variable

int i;

Advantages:

  • is valid throughout the whole program execution.

Disadvantages:

  • can be accessed with extern to create spaghetti code.
  • "Pollutes" the global namespace.
  • Not thread-safe.
  • Initialized at program startup, which creates program overhead.

Local/private variable

static int i;

Advantages:

  • is valid throughout the whole program execution.
  • Can only be accessed by files in the same "module"/"translation unit" (same .c file).
  • Provides private encapsulation since it cannot be accessed by the caller.

Disadvantages:

  • Not thread-safe.
  • Initialized at program startup, which creates program overhead.

My personal opinion is that there is never a reason to use global variables nor the extern keyword. I have been programming for 15+ years and never needed to use either. I have programmed everything from realtime embedded systems to Windows GUI fluff apps and I have never needed to use global variables in any form of application. Furthermore, they are banned in pretty much every single known C coding standard.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.