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I have Foo.java, which is interface.

And lots of classes that implement it. Bar1.java , Bar2.java etc.

I have a method in frontend, that is like this: getBar(String bar)

I could just do it like this:

if(bar.equals("Bar1")) {
    return new Bar1();
}

But can I somehow do it, that everytimes something new implements Foo.java , then I don't have to update my method, with new ELSE statement.

I thought like each implementation have unique ID or something, which I add to BarX.java , whenever I create it.

Any suggestions or thoughts? I thought maybe I can use enum or smthing or any other solution.

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1  
Comparing strings with == does not do what you think it does. Use equals() to compare strings instead. –  Jesper Oct 4 '12 at 13:34
1  
Are you talking about Factory Pattern :) –  Kaipa M Sarma Oct 4 '12 at 13:35
    
Do you mean String getBar() rather than getBar(String bar)? –  Edd Oct 4 '12 at 13:36
    
@Edd : no ... I have lots of bars, so user defined somekind of identifier for bar, so I get that bar, that user defines. problem is how and which identifier to use. –  Jaanus Oct 4 '12 at 13:38
1  
@Shingetsu You could fill the Map with a .properties file (or xml or ...) where you store key string and classname - pairs. So you don't even have to touch code every time. –  Fildor Oct 4 '12 at 13:46
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

FYI: You realize, of course, that you should not write this:

if(bar == "Bar1") {
    return new Bar1();
}

You should do it this way:

if("Bar1".equals(bar)) {
    return new Bar1();
}

Looks like you need a factory (aka virtual constructor). If all your Foo implementers have a default constructor, you can do this:

public class FooFactory {

    public static Foo create(Class<Foo> clazz) {
        return clazz.newInstance();
    }

    public static Foo create(String className) {
        return create(Class.forName(className));
    }
}

There are exceptions to be handled; I don't have time to spell them out for you. You should see the idea. All you need to do is write a new class and your factory can handle it.

If there are other constructors, just elaborate the theme with parameters and additional calls. This should get you started.

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Does the ´Class<Foo>` mean that it looks for implementation of Foo? Must the user provide full package path or just classname? –  Jaanus Oct 4 '12 at 13:43
    
Yoda conditionals in Java? hahahaha –  Shark Oct 4 '12 at 13:54
    
Equals versus == is the point. Class name must be full package name. –  duffymo Oct 4 '12 at 13:58
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Sounds to me like a job for dependency injection or reflection.

You can do :

Class myClass = Class.forName("my.namespace.MyClass");

That would be with reflection. Not very nice but doing the job.

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+1 for reflection, though I'm sure there's a better way (my java is rusty :( ) –  Shingetsu Oct 4 '12 at 13:38
    
As I say: It's surely not nice & clean. I think DI would be a cleaner approach, but I have no experiences with it. –  Fildor Oct 4 '12 at 13:39
    
Can you remind me if java can store Types? Because Map<String,Type> would be so pretty –  Shingetsu Oct 4 '12 at 13:41
    
Should be possible with a Class object. Haven't had the urge to do so, but I cannot see why it should not be possible. –  Fildor Oct 4 '12 at 13:42
    
^ because oracle. but yes, that would be a faster method than reflection, which is interesting because OP tells us of "a lot of implementations". –  Shingetsu Oct 4 '12 at 13:44
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You can create object by class name:

Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(className);
Object object = ctor.newInstance();

Or if you need call particular constructor (with one String argument strArgument for example):

Constructor<?> c = clazz.getConstructor(String.class);
Object object = c.newInstance(new Object[] { strArgument });
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- Reflection is the way to go...

- But still you can use a method like this

public static Foo createObj(Class<Foo> clazz) {
    return clazz.newInstance();
}

- And yes to mention, that it should be equals() and not ==

if(bar.equals("Bar1")) {
    return new Bar1();
}
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Does the ´Class<Foo>` mean that it looks for implementation of Foo? Also user can only enter string front frontend. –  Jaanus Oct 4 '12 at 13:44
    
@Jaanus What i have written in my answer Class<Foo>, is about Interface Polymorphism and Not Class Polymorphism...In Interface Polymorphism, Classes from different inheritance tree can implement the same interface, just they need to implement that interface, and Unlike Class polymorphism they don't need to be an Super class and Sub class relationship. So yes it will look for the implementation of Foo –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Oct 4 '12 at 13:53
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This is a classic factory pattern issue.

The solution is whenever you have to maintain a static Map and whenever you have a new "Bar" type you need to registed it in the map first, so whenever you want an object of that type, you can simply pick it from the map.

Consider the below classes

interface IVehicle {
    public void drive();
    public void stop();
}

class Car implements IVehicle {

    public void drive(){
        //logic goes here
    }

    public void stop(){
        //logic goes here
    }
}

class VehicleFactory{

    public IVehicle createVehicle(String VehicleType){
        IVehicle vehicle = null;

        if("Car".equalsIgnoreCase(VehicleType) ){
            vehicle = new Car();
        }
        if("Bus".equalsIgnoreCase(VehicleType) ){
            //vehicle = new Bus();
        }
        if("Train".equalsIgnoreCase(VehicleType) ){
            //vehicle = new Train();
        }
        return vehicle;
    }
}

so whenever you have a new type of vehicle, you have to change the metho by adding the code for new Type of vehicle.

The solution is to improve the VehicleFactory class as below and all vehicle types should register in the map as shown below.

class Car implements IVehicle {

    static{
        VehicleFactoryFlexible.registerVehicle("Car", new Car());
    }
    public void drive(){
        //logic goes here
    }

    public void stop(){
        //logic goes here
    }

    public IVehicle createVehicle(){
        return (IVehicle) new Car();
    }
}

public class VehicleFactoryFlexible {

    static Map vehicleRegistry = new HashMap();

    public static void registerVehicle(String vehicleType, IVehicle veh){
        vehicleRegistry.put(vehicleType, veh);
    }

    public IVehicle createVehicle(String vehicleType){
        IVehicle vehicle = (IVehicle)vehicleRegistry.get(vehicleType);
        return vehicle.createVehicle();
    }
}
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Using reflection you can scan a whole package for all of your BarX classes and work with this list instanciating if your input exists in the list. Or you could just use a Class.forName solution catching directly the error. EDIT: check this out http://code.google.com/p/reflections/

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