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#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>

void sanity_check(int x)
{
    if (x < 0)
    {
        x = -x;
    }
    if (x == INT_MIN)
    {
        printf("%d == %d\n", x, INT_MIN);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("%d != %d\n", x, INT_MIN);
    }
    if (x < 0)
    {
        printf("negative number: %d\n", x);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("positive number: %d\n", x);
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    sanity_check(42);
    sanity_check(-97);
    sanity_check(INT_MIN);
    return 0;
}

When I compile the above program with gcc wtf.c, I get the expected output:

42 != -2147483648
positive number: 42
97 != -2147483648
positive number: 97
-2147483648 == -2147483648
negative number: -2147483648

However, when I compile the program with gcc -O2 wtf.c, I get a different output:

42 != -2147483648
positive number: 42
97 != -2147483648
positive number: 97
-2147483648 != -2147483648
positive number: -2147483648

Note the last two lines. What on earth is going on here? Is gcc 4.6.3 optimizing a bit too eagerly?

(I also tested this with g++ 4.6.3, and I observed the same strange behavior, hence the C++ tag.)

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not feel comfortable to give advice for possibly much more experienced developer, but anyway it might be useful for not so experienced. If I see "strange" differences caused by only optimization level, the first thing I will look for is UB. –  ThomasMore Oct 4 '12 at 15:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

When you do -(INT_MIN) you're invoking undefined behavior, since that result can't fit in an int.

gcc -O2 notices that x can never be negative and optimizes thereafter. It doesn't care that you overflowed the value since that's undefined and it can treat it however it wants.

share|improve this answer
    
Nothing prevents a compiler from defining that which is UB in the standard, such as non-trapping two's complement arithmetic. So one must wonder, what is the benefit of doing the alleged optimization? None, as far as I can see. It's an idiot's optimization, IMHO. So while the compiler is formally within its rights, it's a low quality implementation at least in this respect. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 4 '12 at 14:19
2  
There's an example in pedr0's answer. For some more see here: blog.llvm.org/2011/05/… –  Per Johansson Oct 4 '12 at 14:24
    
very thanks for the link! note that the first two paragraphs strongly imply logical fallacies of the kind "X is one possible way of doing Y, therefore X is required for Y". i stopped reading after that... :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 4 '12 at 14:37
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf Can you be specific what formulations imply that kind of fallacy? I haven't found any in the first two paragraphs of either the "signed integer oveflow" part or the entire article. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 4 '12 at 15:05
    
@DanielFischer: for example, in the first paragraph, <<knowing that INT_MAX+1 is undefined allows optimizing "X+1 > X" to "true">> as an example of <<enables certain classes of optimizations>> implies [since X=overflow-is-UB is one way of achieving Y=optimization-of-x+1>x, X=overflow-is-UB is required for Y=optimization-of-x+1>x]. Which is a fallacy. In the second paragraph the wilful ignorance of logic, or deception if you want, is even worse: <<[wrap around ] then disables these important loop optimizations>> is blatantly untrue as a general statement (which it pretends to be). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 4 '12 at 15:17

I think this could help you, is from here :here

-fstrict-overflow Allow the compiler to assume strict signed overflow rules, depending on the language being compiled. For C (and C++) this means that overflow when doing arithmetic with signed numbers is undefined, which means that the compiler may assume that it will not happen. This permits various optimizations. For example, the compiler will assume that an expression like i + 10 > i will always be true for signed i. This assumption is only valid if signed overflow is undefined, as the expression is false if i + 10 overflows when using twos complement arithmetic. When this option is in effect any attempt to determine whether an operation on signed numbers will overflow must be written carefully to not actually involve overflow. This option also allows the compiler to assume strict pointer semantics: given a pointer to an object, if adding an offset to that pointer does not produce a pointer to the same object, the addition is undefined. This permits the compiler to conclude that p + u > p is always true for a pointer p and unsigned integer u. This assumption is only valid because pointer wraparound is undefined, as the expression is false if p + u overflows using twos complement arithmetic.

See also the -fwrapv option. Using -fwrapv means that integer signed overflow is fully defined: it wraps. When -fwrapv is used, there is no difference between -fstrict-overflow and -fno-strict-overflow for integers. With -fwrapv certain types of overflow are permitted. For example, if the compiler gets an overflow when doing arithmetic on constants, the overflowed value can still be used with -fwrapv, but not otherwise.

The -fstrict-overflow option is enabled at levels -O2, -O3, -Os.

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