Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Is it possible to avoid repeating the class name in the implementation file?

I've been working on trying to (re)learn c++ and I am having some comprehension issues with c++ object oriented programming. I've spent a lot of time recently working in Java and perhaps that has made me lazy, but here are the problems I am having.

Here is the not-entirely-complete code with which I am working:

class Pong{
    public:
        Pong();
        void run();


    private:
        //Class to represent a pong ball
        class Ball{
            public:
                Ball();
                int getVector();
            private:
                int xvel,yvel;
        };

        //Class to represent a pong paddle
        class Paddle{
            public:
            private:
        };

        bool init();
        //The ball and player paddles
        Ball ball;
        Paddle p1;
        Paddle p2;
};
//Ball members
Pong::Ball::Ball(){

}
//Paddle members
Pong::Paddle::Paddle(){

}

//Pong members
Pong::Pong() : ball(Ball()),p1(Paddle()),p2(Paddle()){
    ball = Ball();
    p1 = Paddle();
    p2 = Paddle();
}
bool Pong::init(){
    if(!log("Starting pong...")){return 2;}
    return 0;
}
void Pong::run(){
    if(Pong::init() != 0){log("Failed to initialize Pong!");}
    return;
}

The issues I have here are really about readability. I am wondering if there is a less ugly looking way of defining members and nested member members without having to specify something like, for instance, Pong::Ball::Ball(), IE putting the namespace in front of every single member.

Am I doing something wrong here? Coming from java where all members are defined inside the class itself, this seems really... crude to me, perhaps, to define everything (including nested class methods) outside of the class definition. It works, but I cannot help feeling like there is a better way to do it, yet the resource I have been using (cprogramming.com) says this is the way it needs to be done.

(Edit: Just before someone catches me, I know I can remove the duplicate definitions inside the Pong constructor. I just haven't yet...)

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Rob Kennedy, larsmans, BЈовић, jogojapan, SingerOfTheFall Oct 25 '12 at 9:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Those are not namespaces, but nested classes. Namespaces are opened with the namespace keyword, and you don't need the qualification if the definition is within the namespace braces. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 4 '12 at 14:25
    
Perhaps, but I looked at the answers and they don't seem to provide the same ... information I am looking for. –  Arialth Oct 4 '12 at 14:35
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Coming from java where all members are defined inside the class itself, this seems really... crude to me, perhaps, to define everything (including nested class methods) outside of the class definition.

That's a non-issue. C++ is so awesome that it lets you define methods both inside and outside of the class definition.

If you want to keep the definition outside, no, there's no way to reduce the qualifications.

I'm only pointing the following out because I think you might have it wrong:

Pong::Pong() : ball(Ball()),p1(Paddle()),p2(Paddle()){
    ball = Ball();
    p1 = Paddle();
    p2 = Paddle();
}

should be

Pong::Pong(){
}

i.e. - no need for any explicit initialization.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I have honestly just been following what I have been told in the tutorials over on cprogramming.com. Is there no difference between defining them on the inside and outside? –  Arialth Oct 4 '12 at 14:26
    
If all the member types have constructors, then both are equivalent and so is not providing the constructor at all (which involves less coding). If any of the members is a POD type then they are not equivalent. That is, prefer to either explicitly initialize: Pong::Pong() : ball(), p1(), p2() {} (if any of the members is POD) or avoid providing the constructor altogether –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 4 '12 at 14:29
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas yes - in his example - Ball is not a POD type and Paddle is empty. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 4 '12 at 14:31
    
Roger. So. I am safe to place all method definitions inside the class {}; itself? And what exactly is the difference if a member is a plain old data type? I should make sure to specify it in the corresponding initialization list? –  Arialth Oct 4 '12 at 14:32
    
@Arialth if it's a POD member, it will not be initialized by default. For example, the Pong constructor I wrote won't initialize Paddle (which is fine in this case, since it's empty) but will initialize Ball (because it's not a POD type). And yes, you can put definitions inside the class if you prefer. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 4 '12 at 14:34
show 3 more comments

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.