Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want know when all thread has been finished in a multithread program

without something like pooling

while(!allThreadFinished){
thread.sleep(100);
}

The solution should be used Monitor but i can't how can i approve that it's correct. since the "SomeMethod" in the following code using network, it consume times.

public object SomeMethod(string input);
public object[] MultiThreadMethod(string[] inputs) {
            var result = new object[inputs.Count()];
            int i = 0;
            foreach (var item in inputs) {
                BackgroundWorker work = new BackgroundWorker();
                work.DoWork += (sender, doWorkEventArgs) => { doWorkEventArgs.Result = SomeMethod(item); };
                work.RunWorkerCompleted += (sender, runWorkerCompletedEventArgs) => { 
                    result[i] = runWorkerCompletedEventArgs.Result; 
                };
                i++;
                work.RunWorkerAsync();
            }
            /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
            //**wait while all thread has been completed**
            /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
            return result;
        }
share|improve this question
    
Since you're using BackgroundWorker it must mean you're in a GUI environment, in which case you shouldn't be blocking until they all finish, you should continue on and simply run some code once they are all done. Either that, or you aren't in a UI environment (or already are in a background thread) in which case you shouldn't be using BackgroundWorker here. –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 14:39
    
you mean it's better to use Thread? –  Ali Oct 4 '12 at 15:16
    
Well, it depends. Are you in a GUI environment? Is this method running from the UI thread? If so, you shouldn't be blocking at all, you should be creating the background tasks and then simply executing some code when they are all done. If you're not in a UI thread and you really do need to block, then you should probably be using Tasks rather than BackgroundWorkers (or threads). –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 15:18
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd537608.aspx

// Sequential version

foreach (var item in sourceCollection)
    Process(item);

// Parallel equivalent

Parallel.ForEach(sourceCollection, item => Process(item));
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use TPL to do the same, you will avoid using Thread.Sleep(), and it will be much clearer. Check this out: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd537610.aspx

Your example with TPL would look like this (untested code):

    private ConcurrentBag<object> _results;
    public object[] MultiThreadMethod(string[] inputs)
    {
        _results = new ConcurrentBag<object>();
        var tasks = new Task[inputs.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < inputs.Length; i++)
        {
            tasks[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoWork(inputs[i]));
        }

        Task.WaitAll(tasks);
        return _results.ToArray();
    }

    private void DoWork(string item)
    {
        _results.Add(SomeMethod(item));
    }

EDIT: Without ConcurrentBag:

public object[] MultiThreadMethod(string[] inputs)
    {
        var tasks = new Task<object>[inputs.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < inputs.Length; i++)
        {
            tasks[i] = Task<object>.Factory.StartNew(() => DoWork(inputs[i]));
        }

        Task.WaitAll(tasks);
        return tasks.Select(task => task.Result).ToArray();
    }

    private object DoWork(string item)
    {
        return SomeMethod(item);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You don't actually use (or need) your concurrentbag. WaitAll returns an array of the results of each task, which is exactly what he needs. –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 14:42
    
You are right.. Edit.. ;) –  margabit Oct 4 '12 at 14:49
    
You don't need to select the results from the tasks array. As I said, WaitAll returns the results as an array already, just return the results of WaitAll. –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 14:55
    
Are you sure? In fwk 4 Task.WaitAll(tasks); is void or returns bool. Maybe you mean another way.. –  margabit Oct 4 '12 at 15:00
    
Ah, I'm thinking WhenAll. You could return Task.WhenAll(tasks).Result;. –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 15:03
show 1 more comment

Try using the TPL http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460717.aspx.

 List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();

 Task t1 = new Task(() =>
 {
    // Do something here...

 });
 t1.Start();
 tasks.Add(t1);

 Task t2 = new Task(() =>
 {
    // Do something here...

 });
 t2.Start();
 tasks.Add(t2);

 Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
share|improve this answer
1  
You'd want Task<object> here, not Task as they each return a result. –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 14:41
    
You mean Task<TResult> ? –  Jeffrey Kevin Pry Oct 4 '12 at 15:09
1  
Well, yes, but where TResult is of type object. The method isn't generic (although doing that might not be a terrible idea). If you choose to have the tasks not return anything then you'll need to have them all add the items to a collection in the body of the task and ensure that it is done so without creating race conditions. –  Servy Oct 4 '12 at 15:12
1  
Best Answer... I used Data Parallelism for this question. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd537608.aspx –  Ali Oct 4 '12 at 19:08
add comment

Hook the RunWorkerCompleted event on the BackgroundWorker. It will fire when the work is done.

A complete example of how to use the BackgroundWorker properly can be found here.

share|improve this answer
    
I use RunWorkerCompleted in the Code. but i want know when all of them are finished. –  Ali Oct 4 '12 at 15:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.