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I'm having a difficult time understanding the rationale behind the semantics of the Java String(byte[]) constructors (Java 6). The length of the resulting String object is usually wrong. Perhaps someone here can explain why this makes any sense.

Consider the following small Java program:

import java.nio.charset.Charset;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String abc1 = new String("abc");
        byte[] bytes = new byte[32];

        bytes[0] = 0x61; // 'a'
        bytes[1] = 0x62; // 'b'
        bytes[2] = 0x63; // 'c'
        bytes[3] = 0x00; // NUL

        String abc2 = new String(bytes, Charset.forName("US-ASCII"));

        System.out.println("abc1: \"" + abc1 + "\" length: " + abc1.length());
        System.out.println("abc2: \"" + abc2 + "\" length: " + abc2.length());

        System.out.println("\"" + abc1 + "\" " +
                (abc1.equals(abc2) ? "==" : "!=") + " \"" + abc2 + "\"");
    }
}

The output of this program is:

abc1: "abc" length: 3
abc2: "abc" length: 32
"abc" != "abc"

The documentation for the String byte[] constructor states, "The length of the new String is a function of the charset, and hence may not be equal to the length of the byte array." Precisely true indeed, and in the US-ASCII character set, the length of the string "abc" is 3, and not 32.

Strangely, even though abc2 contains no whitespace characters, abc2.trim() returns the same string, but with the length adjusted to the correct value of 3 and abc1.equals(abc2) returns true... Am I missing something obvious?

Yes, I realize I can pass in an explicit length into the constructor, I'm just trying to understand the default semantics.

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Did you mean to use bytes[2] rather than bytes[3]? –  Jon Skeet Oct 4 '12 at 14:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In Java, strings are not null-delimited. The string that is constructed from the byte array uses the entire length of the array. Since 0x00 converts one-to-one to the character '\0', the resulting string has the same length as the entire array—32. When it is printed to System.out, null characters have zero width, so it looks like "abc" but it is really "abc\0\0\0..." (for 32 characters).

The reason trim() fixes this is that it considers '\0' to be white space.

Note that if you want to convert a null-delimited byte representation of a string to a String, you will need to find the index at which to stop. Then (as @Brian notes in his comment), you can use a different String constructor:

String abc2 = new String(bytes, 0, indexOfFirstNull, Charset.forName("US-ASCII"));

However, this must be done with caution. You are using the US-ASCII character set for the platform, where the index of the first zero byte is probably a natural stopping place. However, in many character sets (such as UTF-16), zero bytes can occur as a normal part of the actual text.

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+1 for clarifying that Java strings aren't C strings :) Perhaps it's also worth mentioning the String(byte[], int, int, String) constructor that allows you to specify the exact subset of bytes used to create the string. –  Brian Oct 4 '12 at 15:01

The length of the resulting String object is usually wrong.

No, it's right - you've just misunderstood what it's mean to do. It's creating a string based on one character per byte, basically - when you use an encoding of US-ASCII, at least.

Strangely, even though abc2 contains no whitespace characters, abc2.trim() returns the same string, but with the length adjusted to the correct value of 3 and abc1.equals(abc2) returns true... Am I missing something obvious?

The docs for trim() state (after two conditions which don't apply):

  • Otherwise, let k be the index of the first character in the string whose code is greater than '\u0020', and let m be the index of the last character in the string whose code is greater than '\u0020'. A new String object is created, representing the substring of this string that begins with the character at index k and ends with the character at index m-that is, the result of this.substring(k, m+1).

So trim() basically treats "whitespace" as equivalent to "U+0000 to U+0020 inclusive". That's a bizarrely inaccurate (read: predating Unicode, basically) representation of "whitespace", but it does explain the behaviour.

Basically what you're seeing is:

String trailingNulls = "abc\0\0\0\0\0\0";
String trimmed = trailingNulls.trim();
System.out.println(trimmed.length()); // 3

That has nothing to do with constructing a string from a byte array.

share|improve this answer
    
Interestingly, though, Character.isWhitespace('\0') returns false. –  Ted Hopp Oct 4 '12 at 15:01
    
Indeed, thanks for the clarification. –  user1720325 Oct 4 '12 at 15:14
    
@TedHopp: Absolutely. It's an odd definition of whitespace, but it is behaving as documented. –  Jon Skeet Oct 4 '12 at 15:14

- First of all String being an Object type in java, equals() method of Object class to compare them..

Eg:

"abc" .equals("abc")

- You can remove the \0 from the resulting string by using trim() method, then you will get the result you want....

share|improve this answer

First of all indexes assigned are wrong. They should be

        bytes[0] = 0x61; // 'a'
        bytes[1] = 0x62; // 'b'
        bytes[2] = 0x63; // 'c'
        bytes[3] = 0x00; // NUL

If you check the equals method of String class you will come to know the reason. It is iterating over char[] and checking each value if index. So if length is different of char[] it will return you false.

  while (n-- != 0) {
                if (v1[i++] != v2[j++])
                    return false;
            }

Fix is to use trim

 abc2.equals(abc1.trim())

Java doc of String#trim()

Otherwise, let k be the index of the first character in the string whose code is greater than '\u0020', and let m be the index of the last character in the string whose code is greater than '\u0020'

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the byte array index issue was a typo in my post, my apologies. –  user1720325 Oct 4 '12 at 15:17

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