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I would like to do pass a function to backbone's success callback like this

this.model.fetch({
    success: this.setup
});

However, that won't work I end up having to pass the whole environment and wrap inside a function like that:

var that = this;
this.model.fetch({
    success: function(){
        that.setup();
    }
});

Why can't I do this? Even if I bind the setup function to it's parent like so _.bind( this.setup, this );, it still won't use the proper this (its' parent). But only if its' not wrapped in a function...

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_.bind should work for first code snippet –  rinat.io Oct 4 '12 at 14:56
    
doesn't, had explained that. But apparently, bindall just works –  nimrod Oct 4 '12 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

_.bind returns a function bound to an object, it does not modify the original function (basically it creates the wrapped function you wrote).

However, you could pass this bound function as a callback

this.model.fetch({
    success: _.bind(this.setup, this);
});

or use _.bindAll which does modify the object to use bound functions:

var V = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        _.bindAll(this, "setup");

        this.model.fetch({
            success: this.setup
        });
    },
    setup: function() {

    }
});
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I really needed to know the difference between those two functions and what they do exactly. Thanks for pointing me into the right direction! –  nimrod Oct 4 '12 at 15:24
1  
@nimrod _.bind creates a new function where the binding is guaranteed, _.bindAll modifies an object (the first argument) to replace all member functions (or the ones passed as arguments) with a bound function. Take a look at the annotated source, it's mostly readable underscorejs.org/docs/underscore.html#section-58 –  nikoshr Oct 4 '12 at 15:38

it does not work beacuse "this" is the object you are defining ({ success: this.setup }) try this:

var that = this;
this.model.fetch({
      success: that.setup
    }
});

however, i dont like it too much, since event handlers are just that, they handle events, and then do stuff (like setup() method) also, in this case, you may lost object in the closure.

share|improve this answer
    
that's exactly what I'm trying to avoid which I said in my question, not ver helpful answer sorry. –  nimrod Oct 4 '12 at 15:21

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