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This is college homework, I know I'm just missing something that should be obvious but I'm very new to this, so it's not obvious to me. I need to create an empty box (outlined by asterisks) using Java, and nested loops. No User input. constants set at 4 wide and 6 long.

I have it all done except it keeps printing all the right stuff, in a straight line instead of making a box! What did I do wrong?

final int NUM_ACROSS = 4;   // Number of asterisks to print across.
    final int NUM_DOWN = 6;     // Number of asterisks to print down.
    int row;    // Loop control for row number.
    int column; // Loop control for column number.

    // This is the work done in the detailLoop() method
    {
    for (row = 0; row < NUM_DOWN; row++)        
    for (column = 0; column < NUM_ACROSS; column++) 

        {
            if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS) 
            System.out.print("*");

            else if (row == 1 || row == NUM_DOWN-1)      
                System.out.print("*");

                else  
                System.out.print (" "); 
        }       
        {       

                System.out.println();
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closed as too localized by Kris, vstm, David Basarab, oers, Erick Robertson Oct 5 '12 at 13:39

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2  
Can you post something that compiles? –  Fildor Oct 4 '12 at 14:57
1  
Look closely at your braces. –  SLaks Oct 4 '12 at 14:57
1  
Your first for loop doesn't have the braces right. –  Pradeep Pati Oct 4 '12 at 14:59
1  
If you are a beginner: do not omit braces just because you can. You'll end up investing hours on issues like this. –  Fildor Oct 4 '12 at 15:04

3 Answers 3

This is why it's good practice to always surround blocks with curly braces, even if they're only one line. This is your code, correctly indented:

for (row = 0; row < NUM_DOWN; row++)        
    for (column = 0; column < NUM_ACROSS; column++) {
        if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS) 
            System.out.print("*");
        else if (row == 1 || row == NUM_DOWN-1)      
            System.out.print("*");
        else
            System.out.print (" "); 
    }       
{       
    System.out.println();

Your System.out.println(" ");, which writes the new line, is outside of your for-loop, so it's only called once, at the end.

This is how the loops should be written:

for (row = 0; row < NUM_DOWN; row++) {
    for (column = 0; column < NUM_ACROSS; column++) {
        if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS) {
            System.out.print("*");
        } else if (row == 1 || row == NUM_DOWN-1) {   
            System.out.print("*");
        } else {
            System.out.print (" "); 
        }
    } // end inner for  

    System.out.println();
} // end outer for

Explanation about braces

In Java, if a for-loop or an if-statement only has a single line in it, it is technically OK to omit the curly braces. Therefore this is find:

if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS) 
    System.out.print("");

If there are two lines, however, the curly brackets are necessary:

if(column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS) {
    System.out.print("");
    doSomething();
}

An if-else if-else tree counts as a single "line" inside of a for-loop, so the curly brackets are technically not necessary. This is valid:

for (column = 0; column < NUM_ACROSS; column++)
    if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS) 
        System.out.print("*");
    else if (row == 1 || row == NUM_DOWN-1)      
        System.out.print("*");
    else
        System.out.print (" "); 

Likewise, that entire for-loop counts as a single line inside of the outer for-loop:

for (row = 0; row < NUM_DOWN; row++)        
    for (column = 0; column < NUM_ACROSS; column++)
        if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS) 
            System.out.print("*");
        else if (row == 1 || row == NUM_DOWN-1)      
            System.out.print("*");
        else
            System.out.print (" "); 

// this line is inside of neither for-loop because of the lack of braces:
System.out.println();

In general, it is good practice for all programmers, regardless of level or ability, to surround their code blocks with curly braces to avoid ambiguity in syntax. This practice of omitting braces can become dangerous when in a situation with multiple programmers, or even badly indented code. Consider the code in the original post -- could you tell, at a glance, what nested where or was included in which loop?

Another example where the lack of curly braces could have unintended consquences. Consider a situtation where you need to print "First half" if the day is less than 15, and print "November" if the month is 11. The following code

if ( day < 6 )
    System.out.println("First half.");

if ( month == 11 ) 
    System.out.println("November.");

Let's say the project requirements change and you're no longer supposed to print out "first half" if the day is less than 15. Some helpful intern comes in and comments out that line:

if ( day < 15 )
    // System.out.println("First half.");

if ( month == 11 ) 
    System.out.println("November."); 

Is this OK? No! Now you've broken your case for November as well, because the above code is semantically equivalent to this:

if (day < 15)
    if (month == 11)
        System.out.println("November.");

If we'd been using curly braces all along, we'd be fine:

if (day < 15) {
    // System.out.println("First half.");
}
if (month == 11) {
    System.out.println("November.");
}

There's undoubtedly half a dozen other reasons and examples as to why this is best-practice. Getting into the habit of always using the curly braces, even it if means typing a few extra characters every so often, will undoubtedly help you keep your code working as expected and cut down on the number of compilation and other errors you may encounter.

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1  
+1 "it's good practice to always surround blocks with curly braces" –  David Grant Oct 4 '12 at 15:04
    
I see! I had curly braces at one time, then took them out because it still wasn't formatting right, but now I see it is because my system out print ln was outside all of them anyway. SO it would have never created a box.... I did not realize the second for statement needed to be in it's own brace but I see the necessity for that now. –  Valerie Durrant Purvis Oct 4 '12 at 15:12
    
@ValerieDurrantPurvis The inner for loop has to be inside the block of the outer for loop. The if statement has to be inside the inner for loop's block etc. –  Edd Oct 4 '12 at 15:15
    
THANK YOU ALL Very much! That was exactly the problem! Are the braces then, the cue for the program to go to the next step? or to look for additional instructions? –  Valerie Durrant Purvis Oct 4 '12 at 15:30
1  
Thank you! I like long explanation because then I can "see" it emerging..... I'll be back! Probably this weekend. I want to work on it a little first before I cry UNCLE! :) –  Valerie Durrant Purvis Oct 19 '12 at 23:10
for (row = 0; row < NUM_DOWN; row++) {
    for (column = 0; column < NUM_ACROSS; column++) {
        if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS) 
            System.out.print("*");
        else if (row == 1 || row == NUM_DOWN-1)      
            System.out.print("*");
        else  
            System.out.print (" "); 
    }  
    System.out.println(); 
}

Is this resolve your problem ? (put the System.out.println(); into first loop) ?

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1  
The temptation for the op to copy/paste your code and submit it as the answer is great. She'll get a 100% score on it, and she'll not have learned how to program at all. Learning instead to post it on stack overflow with the comment: "Just tell me what to type". We are doing her a dis service by giving her the answer. We should instead be directing her to sites that talk about How to write code that compiles. How to fix off-by-one errors. How braces work. How to problem solve and how to properly indent your code. She needs to learn how to solve it herself, and we are preventing that. –  Eric Leschinski Oct 4 '12 at 15:23
1  
Ok, I understand what do you mean and I'll remember it. Thanks for your advice. –  Cyril Maitre Oct 4 '12 at 15:28
    
It was how my braces were placed. I have it now. THanks for the response. –  Valerie Durrant Purvis Oct 4 '12 at 15:30
    
No Eric, my code compiled, I just didn't post it all because I didn't think you all would want the whole thing. I know better now. It just didn't have proper bracketing, and by showing me how it should be braced it reinforced what I've read for days! All people cannot learn by reading, some people have to be shown and told why a thing has to be done. Thank you emmensly for your concern though. If I weren't 46 years old this might be easier! I have alot of catching up to do! –  Valerie Durrant Purvis Oct 4 '12 at 15:33
    
If you are indeed using this site as help to do homework for college, don't get too addicted to it, legions of people will give you the answers, and you'll get great grades, and find yourself unemployable at the end of your college education because the employers will give you a problem to test your problem solving skills, and you will be sunk without access to stack overflow to do it for you. The biggest I see you don't yet understand is java scope and how the for loop works: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/for.html –  Eric Leschinski Oct 4 '12 at 15:35

If you reformat the code to make it more readable, the error becomes more obvious:

for (row = 0; row < NUM_DOWN; row++)        
    for (column = 0; column < NUM_ACROSS; column++) {
        if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS)
            System.out.print("*");
        else if (row == 1 || row == NUM_DOWN-1) 
            System.out.print("*");
        else 
            System.out.print (" "); 
    }

{ //What's this brace doing here?      
    System.out.println();

The outer for loop (that iterates over each row) does not have an opening brace defined in the correct position. Because the for statement is not followed by an opening brace, the body of the for loop is just the next statement (ie. the inner for loop).

The opening brace afterwards simply forms a block around the println() statement. To avoid this problem, I personally prefer to put the opening braces on the same line as for and if statements to avoid accidentally inserting anything before the block. I also recommend putting braces around one-liner if-statement bodies, to avoid confusion should an additional line be added at a later date. See the following for an example:

for (row = 0; row < NUM_DOWN; row++) {   
    for (column = 0; column < NUM_ACROSS; column++) {
        if (column == 0 || column == NUM_ACROSS)
            System.out.print("*");
        else if (row == 1 || row == NUM_DOWN-1) 
            System.out.print("*");
        else 
            System.out.print (" "); 
    }           
    System.out.println();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see! The braces at the end of the lines were confusing to me at first. THank you for the explanation. I also had a 1 that should have been a 0. All is well now. Thank you for your help! I saved your reply so I would remember next time! –  Valerie Durrant Purvis Oct 4 '12 at 15:36

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