Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was wondering how much memory does an object that inherits from "object" and has no fields/properties take ? And I guess methods don't. Right ? I am talking for .net objects.

share|improve this question
    
Good question. I'd say create a few million of them and see the memory difference before and after. Unless someone's already done this. –  Michael Todd Aug 13 '09 at 16:24
    
Thats why I asked. I needed to know the memory usage of application with millions of objects. So the answer for 32 bit app is the size of all fields +8 bytes. –  George Statis Aug 13 '09 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Okay, as both Andrew and Guffa have given answers which I believe to be wrong...

There's an 8 byte overhead for all objects (on x86), but there's also a minimum size of 12 bytes. I don't know why... but it means that these two classes both take 12 bytes per instance:

public class OneField
{
    private int field;
}

public class NoFields
{
}

Test:

using System;

public class OneField
{
    private int field;
}

public class NoFields {}

public class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int size = int.Parse(args[0]);
        switch (args[1])
        {
            case "NoFields":
                TestNoFields(size);
                break;
            case "OneField":
                TestOneField(size);
                break;
        }
    }

    static void TestNoFields(int size)
    {
        NoFields[] array = new NoFields[size];
        long start = GC.GetTotalMemory(true);
        for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
        {
            array[i] = new NoFields();
        }
        long end = GC.GetTotalMemory(true);
        GC.KeepAlive(array);
        Console.WriteLine("Size per instance: {0}",
                          (end-start) / (double)size);
    }

    static void TestOneField(int size)
    {
        OneField[] array = new OneField[size];
        long start = GC.GetTotalMemory(true);
        for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
        {
            array[i] = new OneField();
        }
        long end = GC.GetTotalMemory(true);
        GC.KeepAlive(array);
        Console.WriteLine("Size per instance: {0}",
                          (end-start) / (double)size);
    }
}

This is ugly because I've deliberately not gone for any generic types or anything else that could cause issues. A few test runs:

>test 1000000 NoFields
Size per instance: 12.000024
>test 1000000 OneField
Size per instance: 12.000024
>test 1000 NoFields
Size per instance: 12
>test 1000 OneField
Size per instance: 12

(JITting overhead etc explains why the number isn't always an exact integer - hence why I do the division in floating point.)

Testing with an extra int field shows the usage going up to 16, which proves it is actually doing something sensible :)

share|improve this answer
    
Good point about the 12 byte minimum but I do think that the spirit of the question pertained to exactly what information is "inherited" from System.Object. You are correct though that on x86, the first field is "free" so to speak but without the overhead of System.Object, the first 3 fields could have been free :) Still, +1 to you for this important distinction. –  Andrew Hare Aug 13 '09 at 16:37

An object has two references/pointers additional to it's own data.

So, on a 32 bit system the object would take 8 bytes, on a 64 bit system it would take 16 bytes.

Correction:
As Jon stated, the minimum size for an object is 12 bytes. The information that I found so far says that the GC requires this.

share|improve this answer
4  
Nope - there's a minimum object size of 12 bytes on x86, for some reason, but you get the first field "free" :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '09 at 16:32
    
According to this msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163791.aspx the GC requires the object to be at least 12 bytes for some reason. –  Guffa Aug 13 '09 at 16:39

The only overhead that you would incur with a reference type would be 4 bytes for the type object pointer and 4 bytes for the sync block index.

So in total, 8 bytes of overhead.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.