Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In c++11 how would one go about implementing a program that does two expensive (network) calls, of the same type, and then only waits for the result from the quicker one, not waiting and discarding the slower result. std::thread cant be interrupted and does not return a convenient std::future. And std::async that returns a future, can neither be interrupted nor detached.

The two main issues are: -Notification when the quicker result has arrived. -Terminating (and cleanup up) of the slower thread.

share|improve this question
2  
use nonblocking sockets and select() –  Markus Mikkolainen Oct 4 '12 at 15:59
1  
Definitely non-blocking file descriptors. You can just close both once you receive the first result. –  Kerrek SB Oct 4 '12 at 16:08
1  
"Interrupting" a program is never natural. The solution depends on the specific details, and you have to design a program so that it can be interrupted meaningfully. –  Kerrek SB Oct 4 '12 at 16:11
3  
for fun you might wanna try to check out : fpcomplete.com/functional-patterns-in-c –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 4 '12 at 16:43
1  
Threads are for parallel programming; for asynchronous programming, you should be using something like Boost.ASIO. –  ildjarn Oct 4 '12 at 18:53
show 3 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

NoSenseEtAl provided a link to:

http://fpcomplete.com/functional-patterns-in-c/

There Bartosz provides example code of some very generic composable async API's. I shamelessly stripped it down to only what I needed (and could understand). Just the "Async Or-Combinator":

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

#include <memory>
#include <algorithm>
#include <ctype.h>

#include <thread>
#include <mutex>
#include <chrono>

#include <random>

using namespace std;

//--------
// Helpers
//--------

void tick(int n)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        cout << i << endl;
        this_thread::sleep_for(chrono::seconds(1));
    }
}

//-------
// Async
//-------

template<class A>
struct Async {
    virtual ~Async() {}
    virtual void andThen(function<void(A)>) = 0;
};

//-------
// Monoid
//-------

template<class A>
struct Mplus : Async<A>
{
    Mplus(unique_ptr<Async<A>> asnc1, unique_ptr<Async<A>> asnc2) 
    : _asnc1(move(asnc1)), _asnc2(move(asnc2)), _done(false)
    {}
    ~Mplus() {}
    void andThen(function<void(A)> k)
    {
        _asnc1->andThen([this, k](A a)
        {
            lock_guard<mutex> l(_mtx);
            if (!_done)
            {
                _done = true;
                k(a);
            }
        });
        _asnc2->andThen([this, k](A a)
        {
            lock_guard<mutex> l(_mtx);
            if (!_done)
            {
                _done = true;
                k(a);
            }
        });
    }
    unique_ptr<Async<A>> _asnc1;
    unique_ptr<Async<A>> _asnc2;
    bool _done;
    mutex _mtx;
};

template<class A>
unique_ptr<Async<A>> mplus(unique_ptr<Async<A>> asnc1, unique_ptr<Async<A>> asnc2)
{
    return unique_ptr<Async<A>>(new Mplus<A>(move(asnc1), move(asnc2)));
}

//----------------
// Fake async APIs
//----------------

void getStringAsync(string s, function<void(string)> handler)
{
    thread th([s, handler]()
    {
        cout << "Started async\n";

        size_t sleep = rand () % 10;
        this_thread::sleep_for(chrono::seconds(sleep));

        handler("Done async: " + s);
    });
    th.detach();
}

struct AsyncString : Async<string>
{
    AsyncString(string s) : _s(s) {}
    void andThen(function<void(string)> k)
    {
        getStringAsync(_s, k);
    }
    string _s;
};

unique_ptr<Async<string>> asyncString(string s)
{
    return unique_ptr<Async<string>>(new AsyncString(s));
}

void testOr()
{
    // Test or combinator / mplus
    auto or = mplus<string>(asyncString(" Result One "), asyncString(" Result Two "));
    or->andThen([](string s)
    {
        cout << "Or returned : " << s << endl;
    });

    tick(10);
}

void main()
{
    srand ( time(NULL) );

    testOr();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure this is an improvement on a well-tested, well-documented library already used by thousands of people (such as the aforementioned Boost.ASIO)? –  ildjarn Oct 4 '12 at 20:37
    
@ildjarn boost::asio seem good, but big. I'm just afraid of the time it will take to learn, especially if I need to extend it to actually solve my specific problem. Does it have something similar to this type of "Async Or-Combinator"? –  petke Oct 4 '12 at 20:55
1  
ASIO is an implementation of the proactor pattern. Some good slides from BoostCon 2010 that show the high-level design of the pattern/library can be found here: dl.dropbox.com/u/10282384/asio_presentation_with_story.pdf –  ildjarn Oct 4 '12 at 20:58
1  
Im glad you found the link interesting. I stopped at the beginning of video 3 because Im in a rush recently. :) BTW Please update your answer with results and experiences if you end up using the code. –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 5 '12 at 8:36
1  
@Ghita : Multiple async_*s (e.g. async_reads) with the same handler, wherein the handler cancels all active operations other than the first to be handled. (Atomics and shared_ptr make this trivial.) –  ildjarn Oct 5 '12 at 19:36
show 7 more comments

You have to use the facilities provided by the operating system to issue "truly" async operations that send some form of notification when they complete. Often such operations can be terminated before completion; if they can't you'll have to find another mechanism, or simply let them complete and ignore the result.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.