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I have a problem considering the endianness of my data types. I have to send data over the ethernet using TCP / IP. The byte order however needs to be big endian when being sent and is in big endian, when being received. Therefore I try to reverse all my date before sending it using this class:

class ReverseBinaryReader : BinaryReader
{
    private byte[] a16 = new byte[2];
    private byte[] ua16 = new byte[2];
    private byte[] a32 = new byte[4];
    private byte[] a64 = new byte[8];
    private byte[] reverse8 = new byte[8];
    public ReverseBinaryReader(System.IO.Stream stream) : base(stream) { }

    public override int ReadInt32()
    {
        a32 = base.ReadBytes(4);
        Array.Reverse(a32);
        return BitConverter.ToInt32(a32, 0);
    }

    public override Int16 ReadInt16()
    {
        a16 = base.ReadBytes(2);
        Array.Reverse(a16);
        return BitConverter.ToInt16(a16, 0);
    }

    [ . . . ] // All other types are converted accordingly.

}

This works fine till I assign the converted values like this:

ReverseBinaryReader binReader = new ReverseBinaryReader(new MemoryStream(content));

this.Size = binReader.ReadInt16();  // public short Size

For example, if I want to save the bytes: 0x00, 0x02 as big endian, I would expect this in the memory: 0x0200 however the short value of Size would become 0x0002. Why is that?

Any ideas? Thanks, Peer

// Edit 2:

To clear the issue up a little I'll try to show an example:

public class Message {
    public short Size;
    public byte[] Content;

    public Message(byte[] rawData)
    {
        ReverseBinaryReader binReader = new ReverseBinaryReader(new MemoryStream(rawData));

        this.Size = binReader.ReadInt16();  // public short Size
        this.Content = binReader.ReadBytes(2); // These are not converted an work just fine.
    }
}

public class prog {
     public static int main()
     {
          TCPClient aClient = new TCPClient("127.0.0.1",999); // Async socket
          aClient.Send(new Message(new byte[] { 0x00, 0x02 } );
     }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It's very unclear whether the problem is with what data is being sent, or how it's being received. Please show a short but complete program demonstrating the problem. – Jon Skeet Oct 4 '12 at 16:21
    
I tried to clear it up a little, did it help? :P – peer Oct 4 '12 at 16:30
    
Not a lot - there's still no short but complete program demonstrating the problem... – Jon Skeet Oct 4 '12 at 16:32
    
Using your aMsg example, what values does a16 have and what value is returned by return BitConverter.ToInt16(a16, 0); – Trisped Oct 4 '12 at 16:38
    
a16 has the values: 0x02, 0x00 which is correct. The return value is 2 (0x0002) – peer Oct 4 '12 at 16:46
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Edit:

Moved this to the top, since it is the actual answer.

I had to stare at it for far to long, but here is the source of your error.

  • Your initial array is { 0x00, 0x02 } In LE that is 0x0200, BE is 0x0002
  • You send it across the network, and read the first two bytes still { 0x00, 0x02 }
  • You reverse it giving you {0x02, 0x00} LE is 0x0002, BE is 0x0200
  • Your architecture is Little Endian so you get the "correct" result of 0x0002.

Ergo the error is in your test array. You can verify that your Architecure is little endian by checking the IsLittleEndian property on BitConverter.

=====================================================

The following code is to help clarify, more than it is to answer your direct question. And to show that BitConverter is predictable on all architectures.

using System;

namespace BitConverterTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            UInt32 u32 = 0x01020304;

            byte[] u32ArrayLittle = {0x04, 0x03, 0x02, 0x01};
            byte[] u32ArrayBig = {0x01, 0x02, 0x03, 0x04};

            if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
            {
                if (BitConverter.ToUInt32(u32ArrayLittle, 0) != u32)
                {
                    throw new Exception("Failed to convert the Little endian bytes");
                }
                Array.Reverse(u32ArrayBig); // convert the bytes to LittleEndian since that is our architecture.
                if (BitConverter.ToUInt32(u32ArrayBig, 0) != u32)
                {
                    throw new Exception("Failed to convert the Big endian bytes");
                }
            } else
            {
                Array.Reverse(u32ArrayLittle); // we are on a big endian platform
                if (BitConverter.ToUInt32(u32ArrayLittle, 0) != u32)
                {
                    throw new Exception("Failed to convert the Little endian bytes");
                }
                if (BitConverter.ToUInt32(u32ArrayBig, 0) != u32)
                {
                    throw new Exception("Failed to convert the Big endian bytes");
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're right about that. As embarrassing it may be for me, I have to admit, that I mixed up the endianness and the byte order and therefore became completely confused. Thanks for clearing that up! – peer Oct 5 '12 at 12:36
    
Don't feel bad it is easy to get confused when you are mentally switching back and forth between one endianess and another. Glad I could help. – grieve Oct 5 '12 at 12:47

Please try the following:

public override Int16 ReadInt16()
{
    a16 = base.ReadBytes(2);
    return ((Int16)a16[1] * 0x00FF) + (Int16)a16[0];
}

public override int ReadInt32()
{
    a32 = base.ReadBytes(4);
    return ((int)a32[3] * 0x00FFFFFF) + (int)a32[2] * 0x0000FFFF) + (int)a32[1] * 0x000000FF) + (int)a32[0];
}

As for why this works, if you expect 0x00, 0x02 to be 0x0200 then you are using little-endian (since the least significant byte is first).

Since BitConverter is system depenate and your implementation is not, I would suggest trying to stay way from it where reasonable.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this did the trick! Thank you very much! I still wonder why the BitConverter did not work, but as long as this works, its ok with me. – peer Oct 4 '12 at 17:12
    
@peer I added a possible explanation to the issue. Since you are accessing the array directly I have taken out the Array.Reverse line and swapped the indexes. I have also added a 32bit example which might help. – Trisped Oct 4 '12 at 17:41
    
Bitconverter is predictable. It can even tell you the endianess of the architecture with the IsLittleEndian property. It does the same operation on all systems, you just have to put the bytes in the correct order for your architecture before you call it. Technically you can do it afterwards, but it is far easier to do it before. – grieve Oct 4 '12 at 19:47
    
@grieve I have cleared up the reason for my suggestion. – Trisped Oct 4 '12 at 21:55
    
@Trisped: For BitConverter or equivalent class to work you have to understand the endianess of the incoming data as well as the endianess of the architecture your program is currently running on.You have to check BitConverter.IsLittleEndian (or its equivalent) to make sure you are handling endianess correctly. So it is unreasonable to tell him to avoid BitConverter as it is no more and no less system dependent than any other solution. If he were to use his code, as is, on a big endian platform it would break since he would be unnecessarily swapping the bytes. – grieve Oct 4 '12 at 22:14

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