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bash, parsing part of a file

Case 4
case 4.1
a 3
a 5
a 7
a 1
a 9
a 4
endcase 4.1
//
.
.
. Do things that dont get parsed
.
.
//
case 4.2 
a 1
b 3
a 6
b7 
endcase 4.2
endcase 4 
//
.
.
.
. More things
.
.
// 
case 5
.
.
.
.
endcase 5

Considering the sample file above. the command awk '/^case 4.2/,/^endcase 4.2/' ./my_file.txt

will extract from the file only the information contiained within the required section. How then, would I extract from this smaller section Only the lines that start with "a"? My file is somewhat more complex than the sample, but I think the logic will still apply.

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marked as duplicate by glenn jackman, ghoti, skolima, Björn, ChrisF Oct 5 '12 at 15:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

You could do it with sed:

sed -n -e '/^case 4[.]2/,/^endcase 4[.]2/ { /^a/p }' my_file.txt

The -n tells sed only to print lines that we tell it to. The curly braces are a group of commands, and by the address prefix used (which is the same as the one you used in awk) we guarantee that they only execute in the case block. The group only contains a single command, which is the "p" print command. However, we prefix this command with another address prefix. This one tells it to execute only if the line starts with "a".

By nesting the addresses, we can execute commands that are between the "case 4.2" and "endcase 4.2" lines, and that start with the "a" text.

Hope this helps =)

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What about case 5? and if any other case like case 6, case 7 and so on..??? –  Annjawn Oct 4 '12 at 16:29
    
What do you mean? From my understanding of the question, it is required to print lines that are in case 4.2 and start with "a". Is this incorrect? –  Janito Vaqueiro Ferreira Filho Oct 4 '12 at 16:32
    
The OP mentioned 4.2 but his data file example also contains a case 5. Would he not want the lines under case 5? if not then I guess its ok. –  Annjawn Oct 4 '12 at 16:41

with awk, I thought this might work, but it doesn't

awk '/^case 4.2/,/^endcase 4.2/ && /^a/' filename

Instead, this works:

awk '/^case 4.2/,/^endcase 4.2/ {if (/^a/) print}' filename
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