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I'm building a dynamic SQL statement, that will insert one or more sets of VALUES via a prepared DBI statement, my question is this:

Since I have a dynamic number of VALUES sets, and I will need to add as many ( ?, ?, ?),( ?, ?, ?) etc as necessary to extend the statement INSERT INTO `tblname` ( $columnsString ) VALUES in order to submit only one query using placeholders and bind values- is this the preferred method(most efficient, etc., - reasoning behind efficiency would be helpful in your answer if possible) or should I just be building this as a query string with sprintf and dbh->quote()?

(As a little extra information: I'm actually using AnyEvent::DBI right now, which only exposes placeholders & bind values and not the quote() method so this wouldn't be easy for me to accomplish without creating another straight DBI $dbh and using another db server connection just to use the quote() method, or without altering the AnyEvent::DBI module myself.)

Normally I would just execute the statements as necessary but in this heavy workload case I'm trying to batch inserts together for some DB efficiency.

Also, if anyone could answer if it is possible( and then how to ) insert an sql DEFAULT value using placeholders and bind values that'd be awesome. Typically if I ever needed to do that I'd append the DEFAULTs to the string directly and use sprintf and $dbh->quote() only for the non DEFAULT values.

UPDATE:

Worked out the misunderstanding in a quick chat. User ikegami suggested that instead of building the query string myself without placeholders, that I just intermingle VALUES and placeholders such as:

$queryString .= '(DEFAULT,?,?),(DEFAULT,DEFAULT,DEFAULT)';

Some of the reasoning behind my first asking of this question on SO was because I was somewhat against this intermingling due to my thought that it made the code less readable, though after being assured that sql 'DEFAULT' couldn't be in a placeholder bind value, this was the method I had begun implementing.

Using placeholders where possible does seem to be the more accepted method of building queries, and if you want an SQL DEFAULT you just need to include it in the same query building as the placeholders. This does not apply to NULL values, as those CAN be inserted with placeholders and a bind value of undef.

Update 2:

The reasoning I asked about performance, the 'acceptance' of building your own query with quote() vs building with placeholders, and why I've gone with a solution that involves using all columns for the SQL INSERT INTO tblname (cols) is because I have roughly 2-4 million rows a day going into a terrible db server, and my code is running on an equally terrible server. With my requirements of needing DEFAULT sql values, and these terrible performance constraints, I've chosen a solution for now.

For future devs who stumble upon this - take a look at @emazep's solution of using SQL::Abstract, or if for some reason you need to build your own, you might consider either using @Schwern's subroutine solution or possibly incorporating some of @ikegami's answer into it as these are all great answers as to the 'Current state of affairs' regarding the usage of DBI and building dynamic queries.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you would use placeholders for "static" queries, you should use them for "dynamic" queries too. A query is a query.

my $stmt = 'UPDATE Widget SET foo=?'
my @params = $foo;

if ($set_far) {
   $stmt .= ', far=?';
   push @params, $far;
}

{
   my @where;

   if ($check_boo) {
      push @where, 'boo=?';
      push @params, $boo;
   }

   if ($check_bar) {
      push @where, 'bar=?';
      push @params, $bar;
   }

   $stmt .= ' WHERE ' . join ' AND ', map "($_)", @where
      if @where;
}

$dbh->do($stmt, undef, @params);

I used an UPDATE since it allowed me to demonstrate more, but everything applies to INSERT too.

my @fields = ('foo');
my @params = ($foo);

if ($set_far) {
   push @fields, 'bar';
   push @params, $far;
}

$stmt = 'INSERT INTO Widget ('
      . join(',', @fields)
      . ') VALUES ('
      . join(',', ('?')x@fields)
      . ')';

$dbh->do($stmt, undef, @params);
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, as that's how I had already implemented this I just wanted to verify that this is acceptable and not thought of as ridiculous in the perl community. Is there a way to insert an sql DEFAULT value where a placeholder exists? –  AndrewPK Oct 4 '12 at 16:54
1  
Don't think so. –  ikegami Oct 4 '12 at 16:55
    
Thank you once again for the quick chat and your answer&&suggestions. –  AndrewPK Oct 4 '12 at 19:47

I have, on occasion, used a construct like:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

# ...

my @columns = ('a' .. 'z');

my $sql = sprintf(q{INSERT INTO sometable (%s) VALUES (%s)},
    join(',', map $dbh->quote($_), @columns),
    join(',', ('?') x @columns),
);

As for handling DEFAULT, wouldn't leaving that column out ensure that the DB sets it to the default value?

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you can't leave the column out of the insert into (columns) statement with a multi insert otherwise other statements will fail. If you just leave out the value - you'll receive an error about SQL syntax. If you set it to undef, it'll be 'NULL' in the DB, and if you set it to empty string '' it will either be an empty string or fail dependent on your DB and column data type. Also - any reason you'd use this over placeholders + bind value in regards to performance? –  AndrewPK Oct 4 '12 at 18:10

Unless there is a specific reason to reinvent the wheel (there could be some), SQL::Abstract (among others) has already solved the problem of dynamic SQL generation for all of us:

my %data = (
    name    => 'Jimbo Bobson',
    phone   => '123-456-7890',
    address => '42 Sister Lane',
    city    => 'St. Louis',
    state   => 'Louisiana'
);

use SQL::Abstract;
my ($stmt, @bind)
    = SQL::Abstract->new->insert('people', \%data);

print $stmt, "\n";
print join ', ', @bind;

which prints:

INSERT INTO people ( address, city, name, phone, state)
VALUES ( ?, ?, ?, ?, ? )
42 Sister Lane, St. Louis, Jimbo Bobson, 123-456-7890, Louisiana

SQL::Abstract then offers a nice trick to iterate over many rows to insert without regenerating the SQL every time, but for bulk inserts there is also SQL::Abstract::Plugin::InsertMulti

use SQL::Abstract;    
use SQL::Abstract::Plugin::InsertMulti;

my ($stmt, @bind)
    = SQL::Abstract->new->insert_multi( 'people', [
        { name => 'foo', age => 23 },
        { name => 'bar', age => 40 },
    ]);

# INSERT INTO people ( age, name ) VALUES ( ?, ? ), ( ?, ? )
# 23, foo, 40, bar
share|improve this answer
1  
From my past experience with SQL::Abstract, I couldn't remember if it supported leaving columns out or using sql DEFAULT values so I just went with what I could do fastest/was most familiar with. Thank you for your answer, and I'll definitely brush up on SQL::Abstract again today. –  AndrewPK Oct 5 '12 at 15:53

You've expressed concerns about the readability of the code and also being able to pass in a DEFAULT. I'll take @ikegami's answer one step further...

sub insert {
    my($dbh, $table, $fields, $values) = @_;

    my $q_table      = $dbh->quote($table);
    my @q_fields     = map { $dbh->quote($_) } @$fields;
    my @placeholders = map { "?" } @q_fields;

    my $sql = qq{
        INSERT INTO $q_table
               ( @{[ join(', ', @q_fields)    ]} )
        VALUES ( @{[ join(', ', @placeholders ]} )
    };

    return $dbh->do($sql, undef, @$values);
}

Now you have a generic multi value insert routine.

# INSERT INTO foo ('bar', 'baz') VALUES ( 23, 42 )
insert( $dbh, "foo", ['bar', 'baz'], [23, 43] );

To indicate a default value, don't pass in that column.

# INSERT INTO foo ('bar') VALUES ( 23 )
# 'baz' will use its default
insert( $dbh, "foo", ['bar'], [23] );

You can optimize this to make your subroutine do multiple inserts with one subroutine call and one prepared statement saving CPU on the client side (and maybe some on the database side if it supports prepared handles).

sub insert {
    my($dbh, $table, $fields, @rows) = @_;

    my $q_table      = $dbh->quote($table);
    my @q_fields     = map { $dbh->quote($_) } @$fields;
    my @placeholders = map { "?" } @q_fields;

    my $sql = qq{
        INSERT INTO $q_table
               ( @{[ join(', ', @q_fields)    ]} )
        VALUES ( @{[ join(', ', @placeholders ]} )
    };

    my $sth = $dbh->prepare_cached($sql);
    for my $values (@rows) {
        $sth->execute(@$values);
    }
}

# INSERT INTO foo ('bar', 'baz') VALUES ( 23, 42 )
# INSERT INTO foo ('bar', 'baz') VALUES ( 99, 12 )
insert( $dbh, "foo", ['bar', 'baz'], [23, 43], [99, 12] );

Finally, you can write a bulk insert passing in multiple values in a single statement. This is probably the most efficient way to do large groups of inserts. This is where having a fixed set of columns and passing in a DEFAULT marker comes in handy. I've employed the idiom where values passed as scalar references are treated as raw SQL values. Now you have the flexibility to pass in whatever you like.

sub insert {
    my($dbh, $table, $fields, @rows) = @_;

    my $q_table      = $dbh->quote($table);
    my @q_fields     = map { $dbh->quote($_) } @$fields;

    my $sql = qq{
        INSERT INTO $q_table
               ( @{[ join(', ', @q_fields)    ]} )
        VALUES
    };

    # This would be more elegant building an array and then joining it together
    # on ",\n", but that would double the memory usage and there might be
    # a lot of values.
    for my $values (@rows) {
        $sql .= "( ";
        # Scalar refs are treated as bare SQL.
        $sql .= join ", ", map { ref $value ? $$_ : $dbh->quote($_) } @$values;
        $sql .= "),\n";
    }
    $sql =~ s{,\n$}{};

    return $dbh->do($sql);
}

# INSERT INTO foo ('bar', 'baz') VALUES ( 23, NOW ), ( DEFAULT, 12 )
insert( $dbh, "foo", ['bar', 'baz'], [23, \"NOW"], [\"DEFAULT", 12] );

The down side is this builds a string in memory, possibly very large. To get around that you have to involve database specific bulk insert from file syntax.

Rather than writing all this SQL generation stuff yourself, go with @emazep's answer and use SQL::Abstract and SQL::Abstract::Plugin::InsertMulti.

Just make sure you profile.

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I actually implemented a similar solution, the only difference being that since I had many VALUES sets, and some sets would have an actual value for all columns whereas others would need to use DEFAULT for some columns, I prepared a single sth to handle all cases. This allowed me to dynamically create a query like INSERT INTO `tbl` (all,columns,in,table,here) VALUES (DEFAULT,?,DEFAULT,?,?),(?,?,?,?,?) and so on. I really like your solution for single VALUES sets, and it can be easily adapted to do the same thing mine does in a much more elegant manner. Thank you for your answer! –  AndrewPK Oct 4 '12 at 22:06
    
Reading over your comments, you seem to be biased towards specifying every column and passing in DEFAULT rather than leaving the column out entirely. May I ask why? Both require generating the SQL. –  Schwern Oct 5 '12 at 4:59
    
Sure-If I specify all columns, I can have only one insert query with many sets of values which alleviates continuous load on the DB and also allows me to only prepare only one sql statement. I'm going to look into SQL::Abstract again today as well. The machine this code is running on sucks, and the DB server sucks, so I'm trying to only cause load in bursts so user queries can still be run without much obstruction; hence my desire to do as few insert queries as possible. By the way, it's an honor to have an answer from you - I've used your modules for quite some time and they're great! –  AndrewPK Oct 5 '12 at 15:59
    
@AndrewPK I think the load here is going to be the actual act of inserting rows, not preparing statements. I'm not sure it makes any difference to the DB if you run the same insert N times or slightly difference inserts N times, but N inserts remain expensive. If you want to mitigate things somewhat you can use prepare_cached which I've added to the example code and you can do bulk inserts if possible. This article covers some good things to try, including profiling. –  Schwern Oct 5 '12 at 21:37

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