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So right now, re.sub does this:

>>> re.sub("DELETE THIS", "", "I want to DELETE THIS472 go to DON'T DELETE THIS847 the supermarket")
"I want to  go to DON'T  the supermarket"

I want it to instead delete only the first instance of "DELETE THISXXX," where XXX is a number, so that the result is

"I want to  go to DON'T DELETE THIS847 the supermarket"

The XXX is a number that varies, and so I actually do need a regex. How can I accomplish this?

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2  
why do you need regex? .. if its a series of simple patterns like this i dont think you need regex... In fact this sounds like a clasic case of "I had a problem and I thought "I know I'll use a regex"... now you have two problems" –  Joran Beasley Oct 4 '12 at 17:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As written in the documentation for re.sub(pattern, repl, string, count=0, flags=0) you can specify the count argument in:

    re.sub(pattern, repl, string[, count, flags])

if you only give a count of 1 it will only replace the first

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From http://docs.python.org/library/re#re.sub:

The optional argument count is the maximum number of pattern occurrences to be replaced; count must be a non-negative integer. If omitted or zero, all occurrences will be replaced. Empty matches for the pattern are replaced only when not adjacent to a previous match, so sub('x*', '-', 'abc') returns '-a-b-c-'.

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The optional argument count is the maximum number of pattern occurrences to be replaced; count must be a non-negative integer.

re.sub(pattern, repl, string, count=0, flags=0)

Set count = 1 to only replace the first instance.

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I think your phrasing, "first instance," caused everyone else to answer in the direction of count, but if you meant that you want to delete a phrase only if it fully matches a phrase you seek, then first you have to define what you mean by a "phrase", e.g. non-lower-case characters:

DON'T DELETE THIS

In which case, you can do something like this:

(?<![^a-z]+)\s+DELETE THIS\s+(?![^a-z]+)

I'm not sure whether Python allows arbitrary-length negative lookbehind assertions. If not, remove the first +.

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1  
Thanks for the answer, and sorry for my awkward phrasing. I actually did mean to delete only the first occurence of "DELETE THIS," but thanks for contributing nevertheless :) –  wrongusername Oct 4 '12 at 17:54

you can use str.replace() for this:

In [9]: strs="I want to DELETE THIS go to DON'T DELETE THIS the supermarket"

In [10]: strs.replace("DELETE THIS","",1) # here 1 is the count
Out[10]: "I want to  go to DON'T DELETE THIS the supermarket"
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You can't use replace to regex match. –  iiSeymour Oct 4 '12 at 17:29
    
I dont think the OP actually needs regex... until i see a search pattern that requires it im gonna go with regex is overkill –  Joran Beasley Oct 4 '12 at 17:32
1  
@sudo_o Actually what the OP is trying to do here can be done with replace(), regex is good for complex patters. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 4 '12 at 17:32
1  
@JoranBeasley Sorry for the unclear example, I actually do need a regex, as I said in my last sentence. I.e. I want to delete the strings "DELETE THIS123" and "DELETE THIS736", but I don't know what the number is. –  wrongusername Oct 4 '12 at 17:48
2  
ahh there ya go ... thats what you should have posted from the start :) –  Joran Beasley Oct 4 '12 at 17:49

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