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I followed a queue example from the bottom of the Python Queue page. I want to access some global variables within the worker function, however, some globals are accessible and some aren't. In my simple example below, the 'rows' and 'errors' variables are accessible but then I get UnboundLocalError for count. If i put "global count" then it works. But I don't understand why the other globals are accessible.

File "myfile.py", line 184, in dpn_worker
    count += 1
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'count' referenced before assignment

Here is the code example I used:

dpns = [1,2,3,4]
q = Queue.Queue()
rows = []
errors = []
count = 0

def dpn_worker():
    while True:
        item = q.get()
        rows.append(1)
        errors.append(1)
        count += 1
        q.task_done()

def main():
    for d in dpns:
        q.put(d)

    for i in range(NUM_WORKERS):
        t = threading.Thread(target=dpn_worker)
        t.daemon = True
        t.start()

    q.join()
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closed as too localized by glglgl, Oleh Prypin, csgillespie, the Tin Man, iMat Oct 5 '12 at 20:35

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3  
Pasting the question title into the search box gives stackoverflow.com/q/9264763/395760 as very first result. Is a tiny bit of research really that hard? -1 –  delnan Oct 4 '12 at 17:12
    
Sorry, I actually did search at first. Guess my google-fu failed me this time. –  trinth Oct 4 '12 at 17:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In this case, since count is an integer: -

count += 1

is equivalent to

count = count + 1

So, you are trying to modify the global variable, but are actually creating a local one.. But on the RHS, you are using the local variable before initialization..

Modify your dpn_worker as: -

def dpn_worker():
    global count
    while True:
        item = q.get()
        rows.append(1)
        errors.append(1)
        count += 1
        q.task_done()
share|improve this answer
2  
Nope, it's not precisely equivalent. In-place addition can have, and in the case of some collections, has different semantics from "regular" addition. –  delnan Oct 4 '12 at 17:13
    
@delnan.. OK.. Is it defined somewhere, in what condition they are different?? Actually I have started coding in Python just a few days back.. –  Rohit Jain Oct 4 '12 at 17:17
1  
@RohitJain one example can be lists, for lists += works as extend() and lis =lis +somelis actually creates a new list(lis+somelis) and then assigns it to lis on the LHS. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 4 '12 at 17:19
2  
@RohitJain Potentially, but it could have other names, which would still contain the original list. If you did a = [1, 2] then b = a, then a = a + [3], a would be [1, 2, 3] while b would be [1, 2]. If you did a += [3], both would be [1, 2, 3]. –  Lattyware Oct 4 '12 at 17:21
1  
@AshwiniChaudhary.. Yeah you're right.. There is lot to learn on SO.. Thanks :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 4 '12 at 17:41

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