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I need to read in a file from C, store it in an array and print its contents. For some reason I keep seeing octal in my output near the end. I am dynamically creating the array after counting how many lines and characters are in it after opening the file.

output:

Abies 
abies 
abietate 
abietene 
abietic 
abietin
\320ѿ_\377Abietineae --> umlaut? where did he come from?
y\300_\377abietineous

code:

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {

char c = '\0';
FILE * file;
int i = 0, j = 0, max_line = 0, max_char_per_line = 0;

/* get array limits */
file = fopen(argv[1], "r");
while ((c = fgetc(file)) != EOF){
    if (c == '\n'){
        max_line++; j++;
        if (j > max_char_per_line){
            max_char_per_line = j;
        }
        j = 0;
        continue;
    }
    j++;
}

rewind(file);
/* declare array dynamically based on max line and max char */
char word[max_line][max_char_per_line];

/*read in file*/
j = 0; c = '\0';

while ((c = fgetc(file)) != EOF){
    if (c == '\n'){
        word[i][j] = '\0';
        i++; j=0;
        continue;
    }

    word[i][j] = c;
    j++;
}
word[i][j] = '\0';

fclose(file);
for (i = 0; i < max_line; i++){
    printf("%s\n", word[i]);
}



    return 0;
}
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Code updated to account for spaces and tabs. –  The Internet Oct 4 '12 at 19:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Change read routine:

   if (c == '\n'){
        word[i][j] = 0x0;
        i++; j=0;
        continue;
    }

and add the "\n" back in the printf routine.

for (i = 0; i < max_line; i++){
    printf("%s\n", word[i]);
}

C strings are zero-terminated, not "\n"-terminated, so when you printf()ed them, printf() did not know where to stop printing.

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pardon my noobery, but why 0x0 (hex) and not just 0? at word[i][j] = 0x0; –  The Internet Oct 4 '12 at 18:51
    
Oh, that's just a habit. Not even one of my worst :-) -- I use it to recognize characters at a glance. But it is completely equivalent to =0. Actually I would have liked to write if ('\n' == c), that's what I usually do. –  lserni Oct 4 '12 at 18:54
    
Ahh ('\n' == c) crazy :) Thanks a lot, slowly but surely C is sinking in. –  The Internet Oct 4 '12 at 19:21
    
I recommend "Writing Solid Code" by Steve Maguire. Lots of interesting practices, tricks and habits to take. –  lserni Oct 4 '12 at 19:32
    
I'll add it to the list. It's in the queue behind C-Programming with Dennis Ritchie and Cormen's Algorithms. –  The Internet Oct 4 '12 at 20:54

You aren't terminating your strings. You need to add the null-terminator: \0, after the last character for each line.

In your first loop, you determine enough space for the longest line, including a newline character.

  • If you want to keep the newlines in your input array, just add 1 to max_char_per_line, and add the null-terminator after the newline character when you finish each line in your second loop.

  • If you don't need the newline in your input array, instead simply use that space for the null-terminator.

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Not that it explains exactly the phenomenon you observe, but it may. You do not seem to take into account the terminating zero byte when calculating array boundaries. Just ++ the max_char_per_line after doing the calculations. And don't forget to add this zero byte if the array isn't guaranteed to be zero-initialized.

edit: do you see these lines after the output or in one these lines of output?

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