Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently, I was trying to debug some code and my mind was boggled as to what I was doing wrong. The simplified version of what my issue was is below:

for(int x = 0; x < [myArray count]; x++);
{
    //perform some action
}

The issue was that the action I wanted to perform would only happen one time. Of course, I eventually noticed the issue was that I was accidentally including an extra semicolon at the end of my for loop.

for(int x = 0; x < [myArray count]; x++);<---- Oops!
{
    //perform some action
}

But then I got to wondering... why did that code even sort of work? It turns out what was happening is that my for loop was executing, then the code below was being run as an "anonymous block".

  1. What is the point of an anonymous block in Objective C? When/where are they useful?

  2. Why would my code not generate some sort of warning in Xcode? I guess you can just throw any old section of code inside an extra pair of braces and you're suddenly executing it as anonymous block?

share|improve this question
    
I only use them to limit the scope of local variables. –  Cyrille Oct 4 '12 at 17:43
1  
This has absolutely nothing to do with Objective-C per se. This is a feature of C99 –  newacct Oct 5 '12 at 5:07
    
And C90. And C89. And pre-ANSI C... –  gnasher729 Apr 27 at 13:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

They can be used for scoping a variable. Although it's more of a typography thing, it can be handy when you need to customize a series of objects of the same type, allowing you to use the same variable repeatedly. Say for example that you're setting up some NSURLRequests:

NSMutableArray *requests = [NSMutableArray array];
{
    NSMutableURLRequest *request = [[NSMutableURLRequest alloc] init];
    request.URL = [NSURL URLWithString:@"http://A"];
    request.HTTPMethod = @"GET";
    [requests addObject:request];
}
// ... etc
{
    NSMutableURLRequest *request = [[NSMutableURLRequest alloc] init];
    request.URL = [NSURL URLWithString:@"http://Z"];
    request.HTTPMethod = @"POST";
    [requests addObject:request];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm okay. I guess I see how they can be useful, although personally, I don't particularly care for them. It seems like over-organization of code. You might sort books on a bookshelf by author/subject, but anonymous blocks for scoping feels like putting an additional plastic divider between each book too; just a bit excessive. –  MikeS Oct 4 '12 at 18:11
1  
NB: call them excessive, but having to number your variables request1, request2, ... can be quite a pain, especially when you make a typo and the compiler doesn't complain about it. Make sure you code in a way that the compiler can help you. –  leo Oct 4 '12 at 18:28
    
True, but when the decision was made to give the compiler the ability to help you scope with anonymous blocks, it also removed the ability for the compiler to detect the issue with my original code, so I hold a grudge :) –  MikeS Oct 4 '12 at 18:56

Turn on CLANG_WARN_EMPTY_BODY and you'll get a warning for this. You should really go through all the warnings that can be enabled in Xcode and turn on everything that is useful (everything that doesn't give lots of warnings for code that is perfectly fine).

The feature itself was present in the very first C versions in the late 1970's.

And never heard this being called an "anonymous block". It's a compound statement. Sometimes it is called a block, but I've never heard the term "anonymous block".

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.