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I have two tables like so:

create table doi (
    id number primary key not null,
    -- Other columns omitted
);

create table doi_membership (
    id number primary key not null,
    doi_id number not null, --foreign key to doi.id
    key_1 number not null,
    key_2 number not null,
    -- Other columns omitted
);

I have a set of key_1, key_2 pairs and I want to see if there is a doi that contains the complete set of the given key_1, key_2 pairs and nothing more. I can't seem to think of the SQL necessary to do this. I am using an oracle database if that helps. Any ideas?

Update:

I don't think I explained this very well so I will give an example.

Conceptually, a single DOI contains a list of key_1, key_2 pairs. I have my own list of key_1, key_2 pairs and I want to see if there exists a DOI where its list of pairs exactly matches my list of pairs.

So, lets say there is a DOI that has the following list of key_1, key_2 pairs (each of these rows is a separate doi_membership row related to the same doi):

1, 2
3, 4
5, 6

And another DOI with the following list of pairs:

1, 2
3, 4
5, 6
7, 8

The set of pairs that I have are

1, 2
3, 4
5, 6

I want to match the first DOI given because its set of pairs and my set of pairs match exactly. The second DOI should not be matched.

I hope that clears things up.

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you might want to add a couple more columns to your samples- id and doi_id, so we can see each row has a unique ID, but each group has the same doi_id –  Beth Oct 4 '12 at 21:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the best way to approach set membership is using the HAVING clause in SQL. The idea is to group the elements of the set together, in this case, the membership records for each doi, and then do tests at the individual level.

For instance, the following having clause would check that keyval1 is present:

having sum(case when keyval_1 = <keyval1> then 1 else 0 end) > 0

It does this by summing the number of records with keyval_1 = <keval1>. If there is more than 0, then "doi_id" meets the condition.

Your conditions are a bit mroe complicated because you are looking at pairs of values. One way to solve this is by concatenating the values together (not necessary, but it somewhat simplifies the logic). The following clause verifies that only your value pairs are present on a doi_id:

having sum(case when concat(key_1, ',', key_2) in (<key value pairs here>)
                then 0 else 1 end) = 0

What it does is count the number of records where the key pairs don't match. If there are any, the comparison fails. You need to concateante your key value pairs for the in clause. Something like in ('1,1', '2,2', '3,14').

To generalize to the condition that all match, I use the following:

select doi_id
from doi_membership
group by doi_id
having sum(case when concat(key_1, ',', key_2) in (<key value pairs here>)
                then 0 else 1 end) = 0 and 
       sum(case when concat(key_1, ',', key_2) = <key pair 1>
                then 1 else 0 end) > 0 and
       sum(case when concat(key_1, ',', key_2) = <key pair 2>
                then 1 else 0 end) > 0 and
       . . .
       sum(case when concat(key_1, ',', key_2) = <key pair n>
                then 1 else 0 end)

The HAVING clause first tests that all the pairs are present. The remaining clauses then test for the presence of each pair.

There are other approaches. I find that the HAVING clause is the most general, because it can accommodate a wide range of logic on the inclusion criteria for the sets.

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I don't quite understand this query. Could you explain it in a little more detail? –  Eddie Oct 4 '12 at 20:13
    
Interesting. I have never used oracle's having clause to this extent before and it took me a little while to figure out what was going on. But I think I have it and it seems to be working. I had to make one small change though. Oracle's concat can only take two arguments so I changed each of the concat(key_1, ',', key_2) to key_1 || ',' || key_2. –  Eddie Oct 4 '12 at 21:30

Assuming your list of key pairs is stored in a table, here's another approach you could consider:

SELECT m.doi_id
FROM doi_membership m
LEFT JOIN sample_key_set s
  ON m.key_1 = s.key_1 AND m.key_2 = s.key_2
GROUP BY m.doi_id
HAVING COUNT(*) = ALL(
  COUNT(s.key_1),
  (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM sample_key_set)
)
;

The query outer-joins doi_membership to the sample list of pairs, groups the result set by doi_id and compares the total count of rows in a group with the total count of matching rows as well as with the total count of sample pairs. If all the counts are equal, the corresponding doi_id is returned.

In case you are not aware of the ALL predicate, this condition

COUNT(*) = ALL(
  COUNT(s.key_1),
  (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM sample_key_set)
)

is merely a shortcut for

    COUNT(*) = COUNT(s.key_1)
AND COUNT(*) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM sample_key_set)

To show that the method works, here are various examples analysed:

#   Rows in "m"  Rows in "s"  Count values          Outcome
--  -----------  -----------  --------------------  -------
1      1, 2         1, 2      COUNT(*)          =2  MATCH
       3, 4         3, 4      COUNT(s.key_1)    =2
                              SELECT COUNT(*)...=2
--  -----------  -----------  --------------------  -------
2      1, 2         1, 2      COUNT(*)          =1  NO
                    3, 4      COUNT(s.key_1)    =1  MATCH
                              SELECT COUNT(*)...=2
--  -----------  -----------  --------------------  -------
3      1, 2         1, 2      COUNT(*)          =2  NO
       5, 6         3, 4      COUNT(s.key_1)    =1  MATCH
                              SELECT COUNT(*)...=2
--  -----------  -----------  --------------------  -------
4      1, 2         1, 2      COUNT(*)          =3  NO
       3, 4         3, 4      COUNT(s.key_1)    =2  MATCH
       5, 6                   SELECT COUNT(*)...=2

As you can see, with this method, only DOIs whose key sets match completely are returned.

As an alternative to storing the sample key pair list in a table, you could use a common table expression like this:

WITH sample_key_set AS (
  SELECT key1, key2 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT key3, key4 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  ...
)
SELECT m.doi_id
FROM ... /* the rest of the above query */

There's also a demonstration of the method at SQL Fiddle to play with.

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SELECT <whatever you need>
FROM doi_membership
WHERE (Key_1 = <key value your looking for> AND Key_2 = <key value you're looking for>)

Unless I'm misreading the question, its that easy I think

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And if you're trying to do this for lots of rows, you can CREATE [TEMPORARY] TABLE key_pairs_of_interest (key1 number, key2 number);, populate, SELECT * FROM doi_membership WHERE (key1,key2) IN (SELECT key1,key2 FROM key_pairs_of_interest) –  willglynn Oct 4 '12 at 18:21
1  
No, my problem is more involved than that. Lets say I have pairs [1, 1], [2, 2], [3, 3]. I want to find a DOI that has doi_membership rows matching all of those pairs and contains nothing else. The two sets should be equal. –  Eddie Oct 4 '12 at 18:53
    
are you saying the records will contain a delimiter and brackets like you used here, or is that just an example? can you be a little more specific about the data types of the key columns in your table and the values you are searching for? Also when you say "and nothing else" are you meaning to say that the 'other columns omitted' from your question must be null, or that your key columns may contain multiple values? –  Tony Oct 4 '12 at 19:00

can't you just use a self-join?

OK, so you don't want internal comparisons, just against parameters/hard coded key pair values.

The internal check would be:

SELECT 
    d.doi_ID, 
    c.CountOfID
FROM 
    doiMembership d INNER JOIN 
    (SELECT 
    doi_ID,Count(ID) CountOfID
    FROM doiMembership
    GROUP BY doi_ID) c ON 
    d.doi_ID = c.doi_ID INNER JOIN 
    (SELECT 
    doi_ID, Count(ID) CountOfID
    FROM doiMembership
    GROUP BY doi_ID) c2  on
    c2.CountOfID = c.CountOfID  inner join
    doiMembership d2 ON 
    c2.doi_ID = d2.doi_ID and
    c.CountOfID = d2.CountOfID AND 
    (d.key1 = d2.[key1]) AND 
    (d.key2 = d2.[key2])
WHERE 
    (d.ID <> d2.[id]) 
GROUP BY 
    d.doi_ID, 
    c.CountOfID

but if you want to compare against a known doi, you can use:

SELECT 
    d.doi_ID, 
    c.CountOfID
FROM 
    doiMembership d INNER JOIN 
    (SELECT 
    doi_ID,Count(ID) AS CountOfID
    FROM doiMembership
    GROUP BY doi_ID) c ON 
    d.doi_ID = c.doi_ID INNER JOIN 
    (SELECT 
    doi_ID, Count(ID) AS CountOfID
    FROM doiMembership
    GROUP BY doi_ID) c2  INNER JOIN 
    doiMembership AS d2 ON 
    c2.doi_ID = d2.doi_ID and
    c.CountOfID = d2.CountOfID
WHERE 
    (d.ID <> d2.[id]) AND 
    (d.key1 = d2.[key1]) AND 
    (d.key2 = d2.[key2]) and
    d.doi_id = 'value'
GROUP BY 
    d.doi_ID, 
    c.CountOfID
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