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I have (say) 2 functions which does a db-hit to fetch a lot of data. Since the two functions are executed one after the other (by the same thread), the time taken is T(f(1)) + T(f(2)). How can I execute the two functions in parallel (by means of creating 2 threads) so that the total time taken is: T(max(T(f1), T(f2))

I am done writing my complete java swing application and want to optimize it for performance now. Appreciate any insight, and excuse if the question is too naive.

Thank you!

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2  
Please edit your post to show what have you tried? What research have you done? What code have your written? –  Gray Oct 4 '12 at 18:16
    
Knowing what library you're using to access the database would also be relevant. –  willglynn Oct 4 '12 at 18:19
    
You already answered your own question. Run the queries in parallel. So what else are you actually asking ? –  Robin Oct 4 '12 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can dispatch 2 threads like this:

new Thread(new Runnable()
{
    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        // TODO Place your "f(1)" code here...

    }
}).start();

new Thread(new Runnable()
{
    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        // TODO Place your "f(2)" code here...

    }
}).start();
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1  
@user1639485 You may also want to take a look at SwingWorker if you need to update the GUI. –  Guillaume Polet Oct 4 '12 at 18:52
1  
Got any suggestions on notifications? Some way to signal the user that the threads have completed? –  MadProgrammer Oct 4 '12 at 19:44
    
@MadProgrammer You could use Observer pattern for this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_pattern –  user1697575 Oct 23 '12 at 13:26
    
You need to coordinate that the threads have ended, using Thread.join or some synch-aid such as Barrrier. Once the threads have reached the end, you can signal the UI using an observer pattern as suggested by @MadProgrammer –  Yair Zaslavsky Nov 20 '12 at 11:52

You haven't said whether you need any return values from your functions, but given the fact that they access the database it seems very likely. A pretty nice and simple solution to that is to use Executors and Futures.

A full code example is here:

import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;

public class FuturesExample {

  public interface ReturnTypeOne {}
  public interface ReturnTypeTwo {}

  public void runTwo() {
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2);

    // Dispatch two tasks.
    Future<ReturnTypeOne> first = executor.submit(new Callable<ReturnTypeOne>() {
      @Override
      public ReturnTypeOne call() throws Exception {
        // Work, work, work...
        return null;
      }
    });
    Future<ReturnTypeTwo> second = executor.submit(new Callable<ReturnTypeTwo>() {
      @Override
      public ReturnTypeTwo call() throws Exception {
        // Work, work, work...
        return null;
      }
    });

    // Get the results.
    try {
      ReturnTypeOne firstValue = first.get();
      ReturnTypeTwo secondValue = second.get();
      // Combine the results.
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (ExecutionException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}

It consists of two sections. First in which two tasks are submitted into the thread pool. Each ExecutorService.submit() call returns immediately a future value of the task computation. Tasks are dispatched immediately at submit() call and they run in the background. Of course you can dispatch more than two tasks.

In the second section the values of futures are obtained. What happens is that the call to Future.get() blocks the current thread until the value is computed. It does not mean that any task is blocked, they all are running, the thread just waits until a given task completes and returns a value. Once the first value is returned, the second Future.get() call is made. In this case, it may or may not block. If the second task has already finished (possibly before the first task) the value is returned immediately. If the second task is still running, the call blocks the current thread until the value is computed.

What the above boils down to is that your main thread will only wait as long as the longest running task. Just what you needed.

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