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Please consider two restrictions -

  1. Can't move MyProperty to interface or abstract class.
  2. FooEventHandler is a dotnet framework method hence can't change paramter type.

I have MyProperty defined in several classes.

class A
    {
        public string MyProperty { get; set; }
    }
    class B
    {
        public string MyProperty { get; set; }
    }
    class C
    {
        public string MyProperty { get; set; }
    }

Method FooEventHandler updates this property for all parameters it receives.

public object FooEventHandler(object obj)
    {
        object toReturn = null;
        if (obj.GetType() == typeof(A))
        {
            (obj as A).MyProperty = "updated";
            toReturn = obj;
        }
        else if (obj.GetType() == typeof(B))
        {
            (obj as B).MyProperty = "updated";
            toReturn = obj;
        }
        else if (obj.GetType() == typeof(C))
        {
            (obj as C).MyProperty = "updated";
            toReturn = obj;
        }
        return toReturn;
    }

And FooEventHandler is called repeatedly like this -

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Program program = new Program();
        A objA = new A();
        program.FooEventHandler(objA);
        B objB = new B();
        program.FooEventHandler(objB);
        C objC = new C();
        program.FooEventHandler(objC);
    }

Please suggest a way to remove redundant code in Foo, considering above two restrictions in general.

To be more precise, I have encountered this issue while using ParameterInspector in WCF. I am trying to modify propery of all the requests intercepted here and had to write Switch Case based on operationName.

A, B, C, D classes as said above are proxies. So don't want to modify them at first place. Since updating service Reference will overwrite my iterface changes.

public object BeforeCall(string operationName, object[] inputs){
    // update inputs[0] properties
    }

Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can actually have your classes implement an interface, to make this easier to work with. The key is that the generated service reference classes are partial, meaning you can do this in a separate file, which won't be overwritten when the code is regenerated:

namespace ServiceReferenceNamespace {
 public partial class A : IMyProperty { }
 public partial class B : IMyProperty { }
 public partial class C : IMyProperty { }
}

Where IMyProperty is:

public interface IMyProperty { string MyProperty { get; set; } }

Then you can change your FooEventHandler method to take an IMyProperty, or take an object and check obj is IMyProperty (or use as, so the check is only done once). This lets you use the property simply, without any reflection or dynamic complexities and the runtime performance impacts of those approaches.

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Assuming dynamic is available to you:

dynamic toReturn = obj;
toReturn.MyProperty = "updated";
return toReturn;

This will throw if MyProperty doesn't exist on obj.

Tested:

[Test]
public void X()
{
    A objA = new A();
    var x = FooEventHandler(objA);
    Assert.IsInstanceOf<A>(x);
    Assert.AreEqual("updated", (x as A).MyProperty);

    B objB = new B();
    var y = FooEventHandler(objB);
    Assert.IsInstanceOf<B>(y);
    Assert.AreEqual("updated", (y as B).MyProperty);

    C objC = new C();
    var z = FooEventHandler(objC);
    Assert.IsInstanceOf<C>(z);
    Assert.AreEqual("updated", (z as C).MyProperty);

    D objD = new D();
    Assert.Throws<RuntimeBinderException>(() => FooEventHandler(objD));
}

class D {}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, dynamic is a very nice solution here. –  code4life Oct 4 '12 at 19:04

Using reflection, you can check for these conditions and then set the value:

  1. Has the expected property MyProperty
  2. MyProperty is of type string
  3. MyProperty has a setter

.

public object FooEventHandler(object obj)
{
  if (obj == null)
    return null;

  var property = obj.GetType().GetProperty("MyProperty");
  if (property != null && property.PropertyType == typeof(string) && property.GetSetMethod(true) != null)
  {
    property.SetValue(obj, "updated", new object[]{ });
    return obj;
  }

  return null;
}
share|improve this answer

My first thought would be to use reflection in your event handler:

public object FooEventHandler(object obj)
{
    obj.GetType().GetProperty("MyProperty").SetValue(obj, "updated", null);
    return obj;
}
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Edit
Tim S's answer is probably the easiest and safest. However, partial class must all be in the same assembly. If for some reason you cannot edit the assembly containing the proxy classes, you can still do this.

Original Answer

This might be a little bit excessive.

Make a new interface

public interface IProxyWrapper
{
    string MyProperty { get; set; }
}

Implement AWrapper / BWrapper and CWrapper. There are two different ways you could do this. I'll only show A as the rest should be easy from there.

public class AWrapper : IProxyWrapper
{
    public string MyProperty { get; set; }
}

Or

public class AWrapper : A, IProxyWrapper
{
    string IProxyWrapper.MyProperty 
    { 
        get { return base.MyProperty; }
        set { base.MyProperty = value; }
    }
}

The benefit of the second is that you can use your AWrapper anywhere you can use an A.

Either way, you will need to find a way to get the values from your wrapper to your Proxy class. You could use something like AutoMapper to set the properties, or pass it in as a constructor parameter, store it in a field, and implement IProxyWrapper.MyProperty to wrap A.MyProperty.

As for getting the values back to the proxy, there is again AutoMapper, or you can expose the field somehow.

You can now customize these wrapper classes further for your application without worrying about losing it when you regenerate your proxies.

share|improve this answer
    
The idea of inheriting AWrapper from A is awesome at times when A B are not partial classes. –  Abhijeet Oct 5 '12 at 7:01

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