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Domain entities shouldn't contain code related to persistence, thus they should be Persistence Ignorant PI

Data that the domain model DM is interested in can be delivered to DM either through domain entities's navigation properties or by upper layers ( ie UI layer or service layer).

But I also assumed that in scenarios where particular domain entity must dynamically decide what data it requires, it is perfectly acceptable for that entity to request that data via component such as Repository.

If this Repository is completely decoupled from the persistence layer, then our entity is not violating PI, since it still doesn't know how it gets that data, it only knows it gets the data by requesting it from the Repository:

class Customer
{
       public string InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered( ... )
       {
                ...
                var orders = repository.Find...;
                ...
        }
       ...
}

As such, why is it considered a bad practice for domain code to also be able to request the data it needs from Repository instead of just receiving it from either upper layers or from navigation properties?

Namely, even according to Fowler ( PEAA chapter on Data Mapper), it is ok to extract from Data Mapper any methods needed by the domain code into an interface class, which domain code can then use.

REPLYING TO Sebastian Good:

1)

The idea is that your domain model shouldn't be concerned with details about where that data came from.

But if domain entities adhere to PI rule, then we could argue they don't know the details about where the data actually came from.

2) You do still have to decide how to load that data, but you make your "application services" (typically) worry about it.

a) assuming the real world entity does have the functionality of searching for particular data, would you still consider the domain entity requesting data as being problematic ( I apologize, I'm aware that it's hard to answer such general questions )?

b) Most importantly, I'm having hard time understanding how application service layer could possibly foresee all the different kinds of data that domain entities could require for processing.

Namely, wouldn't having application layer services be solely responsible for loading the data mean that anytime we change the internal logic of domain entity ( such that now this entity requires different type of data ) also mean we'd have to change the application services accordingly, so that they would now supply to entity the new type of data instead of the old one?!

REPLYING TO Eulerfx:

1)

a) The application service can provide not only data, but a mechanism for retrieving data as well, in cases where it is better to place logic for determining the exact instance of data needed in the domain

So in cases where it is better to place logic for determining the exact instance of data needed in the domain, I should encapsulate an access to a repository inside service S and then pass S as an argument to a method of a domain entity? Thus, in our example I should encapsulate an access to OrderRepository inside ordersSelectorService service and then pass ordersSelectorService as an argument to Customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered:

class Customer
{
       public string InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered(OrdersSelectorService ordersSelectorService)
       {
                ...
                var orders = ordersSelectorService.Select...;
                ...
        }
        ...
}



class CustomerService
{
  OrdersSelectorService ordersSelectorService;
  CustomerRepository customerRepository;

  public void ()
  {
        var customer = this.customerRepository.Get...;
                ...

        customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered(ordersSelectorService);
                ...

  }
}

b) If that is indeed what you are suggesting, are there any other benefits ( besides those you've already mentioned ) over simply passing OrderRepository as an argument to Customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered:

class Customer
{
       public string InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered(CustomerRepository orderRepository)
       {
                ...
                var orders = orderRepository.Select...;
                ...
       }
       ...
}

2) Following question are just so I can be sure I've correctly understood your post in its entirecy correctly:

So if a specific behavior requires access to some service, have the application service provide an abstraction of that service as an argument to the corresponding behavior method. This way, the dependency upon the service is explicitly stated in the method signature.

a) By "specific behavior" you are referring to domain entity ( ie Customer )?!

b) I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "app service providing abstraction of that service as an argument". Perhaps that instead of providing the service S itself ( ie OrderRepository ) as an argument to a method ( ie Customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered ), we should have some class C ( ie OrdersSelectorService ) encapsulate S and then pass C as an argument to a method?

c) I assume C ( class which encapsulates S <-- see b) question) ) should always be an application service and S should always be encapsulated by C ( unless S is already an application service )? If yes, why?

d)

This way, the dependency upon the service is explicitly stated in the method signature.

What benefits do we get by having dependency upon the service being explicitly stated in the method signature? Only that we immediately can tell what the method is doing without the need to inspect code of the method?

3) A bit off topic, but it appears when we inject behavior B into class C as an argument to a method M ( C.M(B b); ), then we don't call it dependency injection, but if instead B was injected into C via constructor or setter ( B b=new B();C c=new C(b); ), then we call it a dependency injection. Why is that?

SECOND REPLY TO Eulerfx:

1)

1ab) ... Another option is to use a lambda instead of OrdersSelectorService.

I assume you mean that instead of passing to OrdersSelectorService to Customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered we should instead use Linq-to-Entities ( which relies heavily on lambda ) within Customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered? But as far as I can tell, this would violate Persistence Ignorance rule ( see my previous thread)

2)

2c) No, C should just be an interface that contains the required method. The service S could either implement that interface, or an implementation could be provided on the fly.

Aha, I mistakenly thought that you were suggesting that C should be an Application service. Anyways, where should C live? Should it be packed inside Application Services assembly or within Domain model Assembly?

3)

2d) ... A benefit of declaring the dependency in the method signature as opposed to the constructor of the class itself is ... Another benefit is that your domain class doesn't need to be part of dependency graph from IoC container - makes things simpler.

Don't yet know much about IoC, thus I must ask how exactly does domain class become a part of an IoC's dependency graph? In other words, must this domain class be specified within IoC's configuration layer ( I thought this layer is used only to specify the mapping between the interface of a dependency and an actual implementation of a dependency, thus I assumed the dependent class isn't even mentioned inside this layer ) or...?

4) I don't mean to cause any troubles or imply one of you guys is wrong ( both of you already reasoned why you prefer your design ), but I'd just like to be sure that I understood your post completely. You are in fact recommending just the opposite of what nwang0 is suggesting ( namely, if both of you guys are recommending the same thing, then my comprehension skills are in need of some repair :o )?!

thank you

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2  
Hi, I think is completely valid to have one of your Entities use a repository, after all both are part of the Domain Model. About what you stated in your question, I can't see any part that says that Entities shouldn't use repositories. An entity calling a repository is Persistence Ignorant, as it has no clue how Entities are stored or which technology is used. –  Augusto Oct 4 '12 at 19:27
2  
Make dependencies explicit. –  Yves Reynhout Oct 4 '12 at 20:16
    
@Yves Reynhout: Could you elaborate on what you mean by "making the dependencies explicit"? –  user702769 Oct 4 '12 at 21:16
1  
Implicit dependencies would be non-discoverable from outside of the class. I.e. they would be instantiated within the class. Explicit dependencies are visible from outside of the class. Usually this is taken care of using Dependency Injection (DI), which usually is simply designing to interfaces and passing your dependencies in through the class constructor. In your case you'd probably pass an ICustomerRepository instance in through your constructor. If you use an IoC Container, this will take care of newing-up and passing in these dependencies automagically. –  Adrian Thompson Phillips Oct 5 '12 at 8:17
1  
Or just pass it to the method, or have a domain service take on this dependency and collaborate with other objects. –  Yves Reynhout Oct 6 '12 at 8:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It isn't bad practice for domain object to request data they need, however it is usually considered bad practice to inject a repository dependencies directly into entities. One reason for this is that now your domain objects become part of a dependency graph which is a needless complexity. Furthermore, a repository typically carries with it ambient dependencies such as transactions and a unit of work. This adds complexity and makes reasoning about domain logic more difficult.

Instead, as specified by Sebastian Good, it is best to have application services provide the data that an entity needs. An application service is a great place to inject repositories and other gateways. The application service can provide not only data, but a mechanism for retrieving data as well, in cases where it is better to place logic for determining the exact instance of data needed in the domain. For an example, take a look at this question. So if a specific behavior requires access to some service, have the application service provide an abstraction of that service as an argument to the corresponding behavior method. This way, the dependency upon the service is explicitly stated in the method signature.

UPDATE

1ab) Yes that is correct. Another option is to use a lambda instead of OrdersSelectorService. If lambdas aren't available in your language then it should be an interface. The benefit over passing OrderRepository is based on the interface segregation principle the goal of which is to reduce needless coupling. It is unlikely that a behavior on Customer needs all the methods on OrderRepository, instead it needs a specific function, so make that explicit.

2a) Yes, the behavior I'm referring to is a behavior on the Customer entity, which is just one of the methods on the class.

2b) Yes for reasons stated in 1ab.

2c) No, C should just be an interface that contains the required method. The service S could either implement that interface, or an implementation could be provided on the fly.

2d) Yes. This is the part of the argument favoring dependency injection over service location. A benefit of declaring the dependency in the method signature as opposed to the constructor of the class itself is because that service is typically needed for only a single method and it is wasteful to make it an member of the class. Another benefit is that your domain class doesn't need to be part of dependency graph from IoC container - makes things simpler.

3) I would call both dependency injection (DI). DI is meant to contrast service location wherein the class constructor or method would be responsible for obtaining required services via service locator.

UPDATE 2

1) Here's a C# code sample:

// this is is the repository, but it doesn't have to be an interface, just some class encapsulating data access
interface IOrderRepository
{
  Order Get(string id);
  void Add(Order order);
  IEnumerable<Order> GetOrdersBySomeCriteria(SomeCriteria criteria);
}

class Customer
{
   // the selector parameter is a lambda.
   public string InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered(Func<SomeCriteria, IEnumerable<Order>> selector)
   {
      // do stuff with selector lambda
   }
}

// this is the app service
class CustomerApplicationService
{
  readonly IOrderRepository orderRepository;

  public void DoSomething()
  {
     var customer = this.customerRepository.Get ...;

     // the app service passes lambda which in turn points to repository.
     var result = customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered(criteria => this.orderRepository.GetOrdersBySomeCriteria(criteria));

  }
}

This does not violate persistence ignorance and is very decoupled. The lambda parameter on the InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered method specifies exactly what the method needs - nothing less nothing more. And it doesn't care how that functionality is provided, just that it is.

2) In the case of a lamda, C doesn't really exist anywhere because it is specified in its entirety by the lambda. If however you were to use an interface, for example IOrderSelector, that interface needs to be declared where the Customer aggregate exists. It could be implemented directly by the OrderRepository, or you could have an adapter class.

3) The reason I mention IoC is because another approach would be to declare the dependency on an order selector in the constructor of the Customer class. Then, whenever a new instance of the class is created, that dependency (the order selector) would need to be injected. One way to do that would be to use an IoC container in places where the Customer class is instantiated. The reason this is problematic is because now you have to make sure to have access to the IoC container wherever you instantiate the Customer class. It is also a misalignment of responsibility, since creating a customer has nothing to do with an order selector, only one behavior needs it.

4) It is a difference of philosophy I suppose. I don't like to have domain objects reference repositories for reasons stated above and other reasons as well. Overall, it is typically frowned upon if you browser around SO or blogs, etc. It is true that repository interfaces are declared in the domain, but it doesn't mean that they should be referenced from domain entities directly.

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I apologize, but if you're willing to help me some more, could you see my last edit? –  user702769 Oct 7 '12 at 17:13
1  
see updates.... –  eulerfx Oct 8 '12 at 22:12
    
Tomorrow I will mark your post in any case, since you already helped me enormously, but if you find some time, could you see my final edit ( there won't be any more edits after this )? –  user702769 Oct 9 '12 at 18:25
    
2)"If however you were to use an interface, for example IOrderSelector, that interface needs to be declared where the Customer aggregate exists. It could be implemented directly by the OrderRepository, or you could have an adapter class." –  user702769 Oct 10 '12 at 16:00
1  
a) Yes. b) The adapter class could actually be in the app layer, because the app layer will be the one instantiating it. However the adapter class must implement an interface declared in the domain layer for the same reasons as a). –  eulerfx Oct 10 '12 at 16:21

The idea is that your domain model shouldn't be concerned with details about where that data came from. You do still have to decide how to load that data, but you make your "application services" (typically) worry about it. This way they can manage the myriad complications of data persistence, caching, security, etc. while your domain objects worry about their domain logic.

Or, another convincing argument is that it is a violation of the single responsibility principle. Now your domain object is responsible for figuring out its own logic, as well as figuring out how to request its data.

share|improve this answer
    
in case you find the time - could you see my edit? –  user702769 Oct 4 '12 at 21:15

There is nothing wrong for domain objects to depend on Repository objects. In fact, Repository objects belong to the domain model and the repository interfaces should be packaged together with the rest of domain objects.

However it is crucial to keep the Repository interfaces abstract and not coupled to the specific way they are implemented. I.e. your OrderRepository should have a collection like semantics and use Specifications. This post has some good examples of building/using repositories. http://thinkinginobjects.com/2012/08/26/dont-use-dao-use-repository/

On the other hand, I believe it is a less good solution to receive the values from the upper layers, assuming the upper layer means application service layer.

In your example, you have:

var orders = repository.Find...;

In real life, you need to pass in some information to the repository to look up related orders. I make up an example here:

var orders = repository.FindByDate(productIdThisCustomerLike);

I assumes that the productIdThisCustomerLike is a private field of the Customer.

It is nature to make Repository.Find in the Customer object and pass in some local information. If we choose to call the repository.Find in the application service layer instead, we would need to extract the product id information from the customer. It would break encapsulation hence a evil solution.

Answers to your comments:

  1. There is no need to wrap repository with a service. I consider having a Domain object depends on a service object a bad practice because the service layer depends on the domain model layer, not the other way around. If you need some post processing on the list of orders returned, (like filtering, grouping or merging), introduce another domain object between your Customer and OrderRepository and name it like a domain object, not a service.

  2. It depends on your use case. If the Customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered is called by your service layer directly, it is possible to pass in the Repository reference from the service layer. However if it is called by another domain object (for example ShoppingCart), the same method will force the ShoppingCart to know the OrderRepository just in order to give it Customer. In general, I much prefer letting the domain object to keep the references to Repositories they need.

share|improve this answer
    
1 - I'm a bit confused now, since it appears this goes against eulerfx, which advises ( if I understood him correctly ) to wrap repository within a service and then pass service as an argument to a method of a Customer?! What am I missing? 2 - are you fine with Application service passing a repository to Customer.InterestedWhatOtherCustomerOrdered as an argument? –  user702769 Oct 8 '12 at 0:11
    
Thank's a million for helping me understand this better –  user702769 Oct 9 '12 at 18:25

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