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I am trying to do a simple project where I have a class and one of its Properties is a structure. This structure contains a value. So I would like to bind a Label Content to this value. How can I do this?

Thanks!

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closed as unclear what you're asking by RobV, Frisbee, dove, akjoshi, dkozl Mar 2 '14 at 11:13

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Did you try binding to PropertyName.ValueName? <Label Content="{Binding PropertyName.ValueName}" /> –  Rachel Oct 4 '12 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

To add to AkSki's answer above...

If you are using two-way binding (read and write) or one-way-to-source (write only) binding to a struct, it will not work as you may expect.

Structs are always pass-by-value, they are not pass-by-reference. Which means when WPF passes them around behind the scenes, they will be copied as new values rather than passed by their reference. This means WPF will write to the copy, not the original struct.

The only way to perform two-way or one-way-to-source binding is to bind to classes.

If you only need to display this struct value as read-only, then follow AlSki's answer above.

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You need to declare a DependencyProperty to expose your value to the WPF system. See Dependecy Properties overview. It might be worth declaring the dependency property on the class and just extracting the value from your struct.

If your existing datat objects are simply for your back end data (or model), you may also want to consider using another class in front of this to expose to WPF, this new class is commonly called a ViewModel. Have a look at Josh Smith MVVM on MSDN for a good explanation.

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It just works. Here's an example :

The view :

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition/>
            <RowDefinition/>
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>

        <Label Content="{Binding FinalDestination.X}"/>
        <Label Grid.Row="1" Content="{Binding FinalDestination.Y}"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

The ViewModel :

using System.Windows;

namespace WpfApplication1
{
    public class ViewModel
    {
        public Point FinalDestination { get; private set; }

        public ViewModel()
        {
            FinalDestination = new Point(8, 8);
        }
    }
}

The view's codebehind :

namespace WpfApplication1
{
    public partial class MainWindow
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            DataContext = new ViewModel();
        }
    }
}

Note : I've built this fast in Visual Studio 2012 on .NET 4.5 but I am pretty sure it works with older technology

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