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Consider the following (simplified) model of an electrical circuit in MySQL:

create table circuit (
  id int not null auto_increment primary key,
  name varchar(30) not null
);
create table device (
  id int not null auto_increment primary key,
  circuit_id int not null references circuit (id),
  chip varchar(30) not null,
  primary key (id)
);
create table pin (
  id int not null auto_increment primary key,
  device_id int not null references device (id),
  name varchar(10) not null unique,
  unique (device_id, name)
);
create table wire (
  circuit_id int not null references circuit (id),
  pin1_id int not null unique references pin (id),
  pin2_id int not null unique references pin (id),
  primary key (pin1_id, pin2_id)
);

As an example, consider the (somewhat pointless) circuit of two resistors connected in a loop:

        RES
    +---/\/\/--+
    |   A   B  |
    |          |
    |   RES    |
    ----/\/\/--+
        B   A

Using the database structure I described earlier, this could be represented as:

insert into circuit (name) values ('example');
set @c = last_insert_id();

insert into device (circuit_id, chip) values (@c, 'RES');
set @r1 = last_insert_id();
insert into pin (device_id, name) values (@r1, 'A');
set @a1 = last_insert_id();
insert into pin (device_id, name) values (@r1, 'B');
set @b1 = last_insert_id();

insert into device (circuit_id, chip) values (@c, 'RES');
set @r2 = last_insert_id();
insert into pin (device_id, name) values (@r2, 'A');
set @a2 = last_insert_id();
insert into pin (device_id, name) values (@r2, 'B');
set @b2 = last_insert_id();

insert into wire (circuit_id, pin1_id, pin2_id) values
  (@c, @b1, @a2), (@c, @b2, @a1);

How would I represent this kind of structure in Haskell? It will not be tied to a database--the SQL was just so I could precisely define the structure I'm trying to represent.

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What have you tried? –  dbaupp Oct 4 '12 at 20:12
1  
I know that your gut response is to expect an attempt at a solution, but that's actually a bad idea here. I've asked a similar question before (stemming from the same confusion) where I made an attempt at a solution, and somehow that derailed all the answers into discussing specifics of my (bad) implementation. I'm looking for how other people would do it, not how I would do it. –  Snowball Oct 4 '12 at 20:16
2  
You might look at the lava stuff on Hackage: 1 2 3 4. –  Daniel Wagner Oct 4 '12 at 20:51
    
@DanielWagner: Thanks. I'll read through those for inspiration. –  Snowball Oct 5 '12 at 22:00
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your pin table resembles an adjacency list of a graph, so I'd use a graph library - Data.Graph or Data.Graph.Inductive.

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1  
For libraries, package names are more helpful than module names. In this case I think fgl is the most complete and performant choice (and probably the one referred to by this answer). –  Daniel Wagner Oct 4 '12 at 21:06
2  
@DanielWagner: It looks like Data.Graph is from containers and Data.Graph.Inductive is from fgl. –  Snowball Oct 4 '12 at 21:28
    
@Snowball: that's correct. Data.Graph is fine for basic stuff, but fgl is much more full-featured. –  John L Oct 5 '12 at 5:26
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