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I'm wanting the user to be able to choose the location of where a program file is located within their PC and save that location for every time my application is launched until they change it. I have never done anything like this with C#, I still consider myself a novice with C#. I've considered making a Settings.txt file or XML file and reading the lines as saved by the user, yet I still am unsure as how to store this. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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1  
Look online for examples of how to write to text files with C#. Then take your best shot at writing the code. If you are still stuck, come back and edit this question with the code you have written, and the error you are getting. –  mbeckish Oct 4 '12 at 20:55
    
I would agree that making a start and showing what you come up with would be cool. I reckon you would quickly see what can be done as you start looking for and developing your own ideas. –  Mr Gray Oct 4 '12 at 20:59
    
Generally we would write to the registry, or to a settings file (.xml, .config, or roll-your-own). –  code4life Oct 4 '12 at 21:09
1  
Thanks, I came here as a jumping off point because I honestly had no idea where to start with it. I'll bash my face against this and come back if I loose too much blood in the process and can't triage what I end up with. –  Daniel Vincent Oct 4 '12 at 21:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted
void Main()
{
    // Settings in a Text File
    string path1 = @"C:\\Dev\\settings.txt";
    string setting1;
    string setting2;
    setting1 = "foo";
    setting2 = "bar";
    SaveSettingsToTextFile(path1, setting1, setting2);
    setting1 = "";
    setting2 = "";
    LoadSettingsFromTextFile(path1, out setting1, out setting2);
    Console.WriteLine(setting1);
    Console.WriteLine(setting2);

    // Settings in an Xml File
    string path2 = @"C:\\Dev\\settings.xml";
    MySettings mySettings = MySettings.Create(path2);
    mySettings.setting1 = "bat";
    mySettings.setting2 = "baz";
    mySettings.Save();  
    mySettings = null;
    mySettings = MySettings.Create(path2);
    Console.WriteLine(mySettings.setting1);
    Console.WriteLine(mySettings.setting2);
}

void SaveSettingsToTextFile(string path, string setting1, string setting2)
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.AppendLine(setting1);
    sb.AppendLine(setting2);
    File.WriteAllText(path, sb.ToString());
}

void LoadSettingsFromTextFile(string path, out string setting1, out string setting2)
{
    var lines = File.ReadLines(path).ToArray();
    setting1 = lines[0];
    setting2 = lines[1];
}

public class MySettings
{
    public string setting1 { get; set; }
    public string setting2 { get; set; }

    static XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MySettings));

    public static MySettings Create(string savePath)
    {
        MySettings instance;
        if(File.Exists(savePath))
        {
            var xDoc = XDocument.Load(savePath);
            var reader = xDoc.CreateReader();
            instance = (MySettings)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
            reader.Close();
        }
        else
        {
            instance = new MySettings();
        }
        instance.SavePath = savePath;
        return instance;
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        var xDoc = new XDocument();
        var writer = xDoc.CreateWriter();
        serializer.Serialize(writer, this);
        writer.Close();
        File.WriteAllText(this.SavePath, xDoc.ToString());
    }

    [XmlIgnore]
    public string SavePath { get; private set; }
}

Output:

foo
bar
bat
baz
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Making your own file type to save specific data sounds OK to me, to start off with.

As you develop your program you may find that a little restrictive but to learn I would start off with any solution that comes to mind then you will probably identify yourself which parts need to be redesigned for efficiency or practicality.

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Thanks, I came here as a jumping off point because I honestly had no idea where to start with it. I'll bash my face against this and come back if I loose too much blood in the process and can't triage what I end up with. –  Daniel Vincent Oct 4 '12 at 21:16
    
Update this question with your progress and comment back here I will respond and give my 2 cents :) –  Mr Gray Oct 5 '12 at 8:49

The easiest way would probably be to use .NET User Settings for this purpose.

There are plenty of other options, including Isolated Storage, or even using one of the directories or registry keys exposed by the Application class (UserAppDataPath, LocalUserAppDataPath, UserAppDataRegistry, ...)

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The easiest thing to do would be add a settings text file or xml file to the project and update it with your C# code behind. It's very straightforward so I won't go into a long description here of how to do it. Just Google search for writing to text file in c#.

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