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I am starting out with MVC 4 (Razor view engine). (I believe this may apply to MVC 3 and earlier as well.) I am wondering if there is any benefit to using the DisplayAttribute data annotation within a view versus just writing a string directly in the HTML. For example, if I had the following model:

public class Thing
{
    public string WildAndCrazyProperty { get; set; }
}

...would there be any benefit in annotating the property as:

    [Display(Name = "Wild and Crazy")]
    public string WildAndCrazyProperty { get; set; }

...and having my markup be:

<html>
    <body>
        <div>@Html.DisplayNameFor(modelItem => modelItem.WildAndCrazyProperty)</div>
        <div>@Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => modelItem.WildAndCrazyProperty)</div>
    </body>
</html>

...versus not having the annotation, and doing:

<html>
    <body>
        <div>Wild and Crazy</div>
        <div>@Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => modelItem.WildAndCrazyProperty)</div>
    </body>
</html>

The reason I haven't mentioned Html.LabelFor in this case is because the property's data is being displayed as static (i.e. non-editable) text on the page. The data will never be editable on this page, so there is no need for me to use Html.TextBoxFor within the second <div> and subsequently use the Html.LabelFor to properly associate a label with that text box.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If two different views are sharing the same model (for instance, maybe one is for mobile output and one is regular), it could be nice to have the string reside in a single place: as metadata on the ViewModel.

Additionally, if you had an inherited version of the model that necessitated a different display, it could be useful. For instance:

public class BaseViewModel
{
 [Display(Name = "Basic Name")]
 public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

public class OtherViewModel : BaseViewModel
{
 [Display(Name = "Customized Inherited Name")]
 public override string Name { get; set; }
}

I'll admit that that example is pretty contrived...

Those are the best arguments in favor of using the attribute that I can come up with. My personal opinion is that, for the most part, that sort of thing is best left to the markup.

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2  
And that's the way I am leaning. It seems that you would want something that is really more of a display-type-thing in the part of the code that does the actual displaying. Having to recompile the project just to change a heading or two seems unnecessary. –  Kenneth K. Oct 4 '12 at 21:02
    
I wholly agree on the recompilation point. I feel like even if you had to use the model in multiple views, the pros of putting that data in an attribute do not outweigh the cons. –  eouw0o83hf Oct 4 '12 at 21:04
1  
So I really like the concept behind this answer, yet it does not work for me. My inheriting class does not override the Display attribute of the base class. Any reason why? –  kehrk Sep 9 '13 at 16:38
    
@kehrk - This example doesn't really work. It always pulls from the base class' definition, even if the property is abstract. –  Jaxidian Jan 9 at 20:10

In addition to the other answers, there is a big benefit to using the DisplayAttribute when you want to localize the fields. You can lookup the name in a localization database using the DisplayAttribute and it will use whatever translation you wish.

Also, you can let MVC generate the templates for you by using Html.EditorForModel() and it will generate the correct label for you.

Ultimately, it's up to you. But the MVC is very "Model-centric", which is why data attributes are applied to models, so that metadata exists in a single place. It's not like it's a huge amount of extra typing you have to do.

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In my current case, the app is just a test front-end for a WebAPI service. No localization is necessary; but I can see the benefit of such a behavior. –  Kenneth K. Oct 4 '12 at 21:12
    
@KennethK. - there's lots of things that may not benefit you right now, but you may wish you'd done later. Using a 3-tiered architecture may not benefit you now, but later... you'll be smacking your head. The point is, use it or not.. it's your choice, but try not to imply that it's useless. –  Erik Funkenbusch Oct 4 '12 at 21:48
    
If I came across as implying the technique was useless, I certainly did not intend to. As I mentioned, the app is simply a facade to a web service. There is no chance of the application being used outside of this capacity. Since the app consists of exactly one view, I could not see the benefit. Now if I were designing a public-facing application with a global audience, yes, what you describe makes perfect sense. It is the size of this particular application which did not make clear why the attribute would be helpful. –  Kenneth K. Oct 4 '12 at 21:55
1  
"It's not like it's a huge amount of extra typing you have to do." It's not the typing that concerns me; it's the re-compilations if the text needs to change. Hypothetically speaking, what if you were in a shop which had "code-behind" guys and "UI" guys. If you had to make a change to a heading, would it not make more sense that the "UI" guy could (and should) do this? –  Kenneth K. Oct 5 '12 at 14:52
1  
The UI guy should know about ViewModels I guess. Also, if you are publishing using web deploy for example, the compilation shouldn't be a concern, since you are always deploying everything changed. When you deal with same object on different views, having it on the metadata is a life saver. Keeps consistency and if you need to change the name, in the view. you cannot know how many views you should change, while changing the metadata will save you from searching all around for that 'typo' –  Bart Feb 11 at 16:56

One of the benefits is you can use it in multiple views and have a consistent label text. It is also used by asp.net MVC scaffolding to generate the labels text and makes it easier to generate meaningful text

[Display(Name = "Wild and Crazy")]
public string WildAndCrazyProperty { get; set; }

"Wild and Crazy" shows up consistently wherever you use the property in your application.

Sometimes this is not flexible as you might want to change the text in some view. In that case, you will have to use custom markup like in your second example

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In this case, I only have the one view, so perhaps that is why I could not perceive a benefit. Notwithstanding this benefit, it seems as though one might have a larger number of views reusing this same property before the consequence of recompilation would be outweighed by the benefit. –  Kenneth K. Oct 4 '12 at 21:10

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