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I'm programming in php for years, but i have encountered a redicilous problem and have no idea why it has happened. I guess i'm missing something, but my brain has stopped working! I have an ass. array and when i var_dump() it, it's like this:

 array
  0 => 
    array
      4 => string '12' (length=2)
  1 => 
    array
      2 => string '10' (length=2)
  2 => 
    array
      1 => string '9' (length=1)

I want to do something with those values like storing them in an array, (12, 10, 9), but I dont know how to retrieve it! I have tested foreach(), array_value(), but no result. No matter what i do, the var_dump() result is still the same! by the way i'm using codeigniter framework, but logically it should have nothing to do with the framework thanks guys

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2  
You seem to have array inside array: so urarray[0]['4'] will return 12, urarray[1]['2'] return 10 and urarray[2]['1'] return 9 –  PL Audet Oct 4 '12 at 21:15
    
Can you show us your attempts with foreach ? –  mario Oct 4 '12 at 21:16
1  
You're programming for years, but you can't tell that this isn't an associative array? –  Second Rikudo Oct 4 '12 at 21:31
1  
@PeeHaa I'm suspecting PHP as in Partial Hospitalisation Program, it would go some way to explain the reasoning behind the question. In which case likely many years. –  DaveRandom Oct 4 '12 at 21:39

5 Answers 5

You can try using array_map

$array = array(
        0 => array(4 => '12'),
        1 => array(2 => '10'),
        2 => array(1 => '9'));

$array = array_map("array_shift", $array);
var_dump($array);

Output

array
  0 => string '12' (length=2)
  1 => string '10' (length=2)
  2 => string '9' (length=1)
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1  
fwiw, you can pass 'array_shift' directly to array_map; you don't need to use the anonymous function in the middle –  Sam Dufel Oct 4 '12 at 21:58
    
+1 @Sam Dufel why did i miss that .... –  Baba Oct 4 '12 at 22:00

You can access them like this:

$array[0][4]= '13'; 
$array[1][2]= '11'; 
$array[2][1]= '10'; 

var_dump($array); gives this result:

    array(3) { 
      [0]=> array(1) { 
         [4]=> string(2) "13" } 
      [1]=> array(1) { 
         [2]=> string(2) "11" } 
      [2]=> array(1) { 
         [1]=> string(2) "10" } 
    }
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Not very useful if he doesn't know in advance what the keys are. –  Sam Dufel Oct 4 '12 at 21:22
    
I think there is an assumption here that he does know what it looks like, though. –  shortstuffsushi Oct 4 '12 at 21:23

like this:

for ($i = count($array) ; $i >= 0 ; $i--) {
    foreach($array[$1] as $k => $v) {
        echo $k . "=>".$v;
    }
}
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If you want them to end up in an array, declare one, then iterate over your items.

$arr = new array();

foreach ($arrItem in $yourArray) {
  foreach ($innerArrItem in $arrItem) {
    array_push($arr, $innerArrItem);
  }
}

print_r($arr);
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If you have an unknown depth, you can do something like this:

$output = array();
array_walk_recursive($input, function($value, $index, &$output) {
    $output[] = $value;
}, $output);
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