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I am interested to know how do you measure the needed time for Magento upgrade? I guess, that most of you had hard time to answer on the client's question: "How long it will take to upgrade my Magento store?"

Usually the client needs to hear just a number for e.g.: "It will take X hours and it will cost Y bucks."

The main idea behind the question is about the technical side and what do you check as developer to make your own calculations for Magento upgrades.

I created the next check list, just for my own calculations:

  • Is the Magento core touched?
  • Is the Magento DB schema touched?
  • Do we have inconsistent data in the DB?
  • How many custom extensions are installed in local and community code pool?
  • Are the custom extension compatible with the latest version of Magento?
  • Did the theme developer used local.xml file for the the layout directives, or just copied xml files from the base/default/layout to the layout directory of the custom theme?
  • Do we have deprecated layout directives / block methods in the layout xml files?
  • Have I developed this Magento shop?

Do you think, that I am missing something and if yes, would you like to share with me and the community your additional points for the check list?

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closed as off topic by Alan Storm, Tichodroma, Sergey K., M42, Anton S Oct 5 '12 at 8:33

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Interesting question - Its probably going to get closed though which is a shame –  Drew Hunter Oct 4 '12 at 21:36
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It's not programming related but I'll bite. You tell your client your hourly rate is $X, and you'll attack the problem of their upgrade as quickly as possible, and charge them $X * the number of hours the upgrade takes, with the option to set a cap on the hours where progress can be checked at and a decision to move forward can be made. If they want a more specific estimate suggest they ask the people who customized their shop to give them that estimate. –  Alan Storm Oct 4 '12 at 21:37
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@ceckoslab It requires a lot of trust between you and your client — but those are the only relationships worth having (in my opinion) –  Alan Storm Oct 4 '12 at 22:08
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Pretty much what Alan said, and to be honest, there are many areas of Magento where this type estimate should be used. It is way too easy to sour a relationship because you gave an estimate based on code you hadn't looked at yet.. only to realize that "previous developers" left a mess somewhere. I like the idea of doing standard discovery. Charge them two hours to look over the site, see what gremlins may exist, and then give them an estimate after you know what you're dealing with. –  pspahn Oct 5 '12 at 0:09
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Given the unlimited variety of server configurations people try to run it on, Magento's vaunted wish to be everything for everybody, module installs, and access to source code by everyone from professionals to "cargo cult" tinkerers... There's no real way but Alan Storm's recommendation. It takes as long as it takes and dry runs should be done on a test server till you get it functional there. Given the unlimited variety of server configurations, this gets you into the ballpark when you put it on the live server, there will always be a last couple stumbling blocks before it's complete. –  Fiasco Labs Oct 5 '12 at 2:37

2 Answers 2

out of topic really but divide the work at least to two portions:

  1. upgrading magento code and database schema (disabling all customisations this usually takes 1 - 4hours dependant of the database size and your IO speed)
  2. migrating theme files to new structure (if they are based on magento defaults)
  3. upgrading extensions one by one (if they need upgrading)
  4. agree on amount of testing
  5. and sell a good development pipeline

and before giving a client quote you analyse the time that you need to spend on migrating themes by diffing your theme to upgraded base theme and layouts and also make a map of installed extensions and their versions and local overwrites.

$$$$

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I'm preparing a presentation for this subject for upcoming Magneto Hackathon in München (Oct 26th). The slides will be available for download afterwards. Will also post a link here.

UPDATE: Here are the slides from my presentation. Full article is coming up next. http://www.openstream.ch/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Estimating-Magento-Upgrades.pdf

UPDATE: Read detailed answer here http://magento.stackexchange.com/a/114/93

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