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I checked here http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=267238 which is the TypeScript Language Specifications but I couldn't see one thing that how I can declare a return type of the function. I showed what I was expecting in the code below : greet(name:string) :string {}

class Greeter {
    greeting: string;
    constructor (message: string) {
        this.greeting = message;
    }
    greet() : string{
        return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
    }
}  

I see we can use something (name:string) => any but they are used mostly when passing callback functions around:

function vote(candidate: string, callback: (result: string) => any) {
// ...
}
share|improve this question
    
Your code correctly declares a return type on your greet() function. What problem are you having? – Peter Olson Oct 4 '12 at 21:34
1  
I was having that I didn't know it was correct. It was what I was expecting to see and what I was hoping to see happened to be correct. LOL :) – Tarik Oct 4 '12 at 21:35
    
I don't think the downvote was necessary! – Tarik Oct 5 '12 at 1:26
up vote 34 down vote accepted

You are correct - here is a fully working example - you'll see that var result is implicitly a string because the return type is specified on the greet() function. Change the type to number and you'll get warnings.

class Greeter {
    greeting: string;
    constructor (message: string) {
        this.greeting = message;
    }
    greet() : string {
        return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
    }
} 

var greeter = new Greeter("Hi");
var result = greeter.greet();

Here is the number example - you'll see red squiggles in the playground editor if you try this:

greet() : number {
    return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it is good to see that what I was hoping happened to be correct! – Tarik Oct 4 '12 at 21:36

You can read more about function types in the language specification in sections 3.5.3.5 and 3.5.5.

The TypeScript compiler will infer types when it can, and this is done you do not need to specify explicit types. so for the greeter example, greet() returns a string literal, which tells the compiler that the type of the function is a string, and no need to specify a type. so for instance in this sample, I have the greeter class with a greet method that returns a string, and a variable that is assigned to number literal. the compiler will infer both types and you will get an error if you try to assign a string to a number.

class Greeter {
    greet() {
        return "Hello, ";  // type infered to be string
    }
} 

var x = 0; // type infered to be number

// now if you try to do this, you will get an error for incompatable types
x = new Greeter().greet(); 

Similarly, this sample will cause an error as the compiler, given the information, has no way to decide the type, and this will be a place where you have to have an explicit return type.

function foo(){
    if (true)
        return "string"; 
    else 
        return 0;
}

This, however, will work:

function foo() : any{
    if (true)
        return "string"; 
    else 
        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for the last paragraph! – Tarik Oct 5 '12 at 15:00

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