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I'm playing around with deriving from System.Web.UI.WebControls.Table/Cell/Row and can't get HtmlTextWriter.AddAttribute to work:

Table:

public class Table : System.Web.UI.WebControls.Table
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public bool Sorted { get; set; }

    public Table()
    {
    }
}

Table Header Row:

public class TableHeaderRow : System.Web.UI.WebControls.TableHeaderRow
{
    public TableHeaderRow()
    {
        this.TableSection = TableRowSection.TableHeader;
        this.ClientIDMode = System.Web.UI.ClientIDMode.Static;
    }
}

Table Header Cell:

public class TableHeaderCell : System.Web.UI.WebControls.TableHeaderCell
{
    public TableHeaderCell()
    {
    }

    public override void RenderBeginTag(HtmlTextWriter writer)
    {
        AddAttributesToRender(writer);
        writer.AddAttribute("test", "whee");
        writer.WriteBeginTag("th");
        //writer.WriteAttribute("test", "whee");
        writer.WriteLine('>');
    }

    public override void RenderEndTag(HtmlTextWriter writer)
    {
        writer.WriteEndTag("th");
        writer.WriteLine();
    }
}

usage:

    <Internal:Table ID="somethingTbl" runat="server" Title="A Table" Sorted="true">
        <Internal:TableHeaderRow>
            <Internal:TableHeaderCell>
                Stuff
            </Internal:TableHeaderCell>
            <Internal:TableHeaderCell>
                More Stuff
            </Internal:TableHeaderCell>
            <Internal:TableHeaderCell>
                Less Stuff
            </Internal:TableHeaderCell>
        </Internal:TableHeaderRow>
    </Internal:Table>

And then some regular rows are added in the cs. I get the following partial output:

    <table id="activationsTbl">
<thead>
    <tr>
        <th>

                Stuff
            </th>
        <th>

                More Stuff
            </th>
        <th>

                Less Stuff
            </th>
    </tr>
</thead><tbody test="whee" test="whee" test="whee">
...

As you can see, the attributes are being written out with the next opening tag after all of the th tags (the tbody tag at the end). If I use the commented out WriteAttributes then it gets written correctly. If there aren't any other rows (and thus no <tbody>), then the attributes are not written to any other tags.

share|improve this question
    
I'm glad you solved your problem, but why, oh why, would you do something like this? I don't mean that in negative way; I'm just trying to figure out why you want to do this. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 4 '12 at 23:26
    
Well, in this case specifically I was just playing around with it, but I can imagine at least one use for it: Standardizing multiple internal web pages that display tabular data. Create a common set of css files and custom table/tr/td controls that add the standard css classes. Wouldn't that be a valid use of a custom control? Could you explain why you were so aghast? (I'm new to C# / web dev from C++ so there's plenty I don't know and don't worry about offending me :) –  carpat Oct 8 '12 at 20:57
    
Because there is already a control that does exactly what you just described, and it's called a GridView. That being said, tables are really going the way of the dodo with exception to outputting data; in which case, you can control 99% of a table's appearance with CSS. Making an extensive code-behind for such antiquated UI is a waste of time. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 8 '12 at 21:17
    
Oh, and one other thing. Why would you bother inheriting from the Table WebControls? You might as well just make custom controls that inherit from UI.Control. Less overhead and you won't have to work within the confines of code you can't see. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 8 '12 at 21:24
    
Ah gotcha. All fair points that can be answered with "I was learning the concept, without any intended application" :) As for antiquated, the place where I work is getting ready to upgrade our public site to asp.net so... –  carpat Oct 8 '12 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

This is an example of a custom control that is light-weight and tailored to the application. It inherits from base custom control I use for all my projects, but it's base class is the System.Web.UI.Control, which I recommmend using over inheriting from other WebControls that have overhead and code you can't see and can sometimes box you in.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Solution.Data.Portfolio;
using Solution.Web.Data.Portfolio;

namespace Solution.Web.UI.Portfolio
{
    public class ClientIconListControl : UI.Control
    {
        private PortfolioSystem Portfolio { get { return ((iPortfolioControl)Parent).PortfolioSystem; } }

        protected override void OnInit(EventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnInit(e);

            Page.HeadJQueryOnLoadGeneralRendering += new Deployment.Web.UI.Head.AdditionalRenderingHandler(Page_HeadJQueryOnLoadGeneralRendering);
        }

        void Page_HeadJQueryOnLoadGeneralRendering(System.Web.UI.HtmlTextWriter writer)
        {
            if (this.Visible)
            {
                foreach (KeyValuePair<string, Client> c in this.Portfolio.Clients)
                {
                    writer.WriteLine("gPortfolio.RegisterClientIcon('{2}_{0}_container', {1}, '{0}');", c.Key, c.Value.SpriteIconIndex * 183, this.ClientID);
                }
            }
        }

        protected override void Render(System.Web.UI.HtmlTextWriter writer)
        {
            if (this.Visible)
            {
                string sImageSpacerPath = Page.ResolveUrl("~/ui/image/spacer.gif");
                writer.Indent = 2;
                foreach (KeyValuePair<string, Client> c in this.Portfolio.Clients)
                {
                    if (c.Value.Projects.Count > 0)
                    {
                        writer.WriteLine("<div id=\"{1}_{0}_container\" class=\"icon\">", c.Key, this.ClientID);
                        writer.Indent++;
                        writer.Write("<img id=\"{4}_{3}\" src=\"{0}\" alt=\"{1}\" class=\"{2}\" />", sImageSpacerPath, c.Value.Title, "spwi", c.Key, this.ClientID);
                        writer.WriteLine();
                        writer.WriteLine("<div class=\"hover\">");
                        writer.Indent++;
                        writer.WriteLine("<img src=\"{0}\" alt=\"\" class=\"spwi spwi_overlay\" />", sImageSpacerPath);
                        writer.WriteLine("<h3>{0}</h3><p>{1}</p>", c.Value.Title, String.Empty);
                        writer.Indent--;
                        writer.WriteLine("</div>");
                        writer.Indent--;
                        writer.WriteLine("</div>");
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

You'll have to overlook some of the functions that are based on the larger project/solution, but by simply override the Render function, this is where you can customize your control without having to mess around with RenderBeginTag, etc.

Not an answer to your problem, but something to consider when creating controls. It took me about 10 minutes to make it, and if something changes that wasn't planned, I have full control to change it in anyway I want and don't have to work within confines of a more robust control.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, I definitely appreciate it, as well as your other comments. –  carpat Oct 9 '12 at 15:13
    
I hope it helps. Good luck! –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 9 '12 at 19:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

And minutes later I realize that there is a difference between WriteBeginTag and RenderBeginTag *facepalm*.

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