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Original Question

I am connecting to a node.js TCP server (on localhost) with telnet and I am trying to explore keep-alive probes.

As a first test, I would like to connect to the server with telnet and kill the telnet session in a way that does not send a FIN packet. (Letting the server think the TCP socket is still 'healthy'.) Unfortunately I can't seem to find a clever way of testing this.

  • When I quit telnet from the telnet prompt, the socket's end event fires in node. It clearly got a FIN packet.
  • When I kill telnet's process, it also cleanly quits the connection with a FIN packet, before the process dies.

Do you know of a way to quit telnet without sending a FIN packet (preferably not involving a network cable that's disconnected / producing a physical networking fault.)

Improved question

I want to simulate a network fault using just localhost / loopback (without actually disconnecting any interfaces / network cables). I want to open a TCP connection between a client and a server, both on localhost. Then I want the client to "die" without letting the server know that it's gone. (I.e. without sending a FIN packet.) This could happen in a real network, if a router goes down, for example.

Thanks to the comments below, I've learned that the kernel will collect any open ports/sockets owned by a process when the process dies (or is forcefully killed), like my telnet above, and will close them for the process by sending a FIN packet. So I need to trick the kernel into not closing an existing connection.

So how can I create a client process, keep it alive, but let it behave like a completely dead TCP connection?

Spoilers

  • (Answer 1 below: Use a raw socket (scapy), let it ignore any packets sent by the server after the initial connection & some test data. (After a certain time, for example.))
  • (Answer 2, Idea from colleague: configure iptables to cut off traffic between client and server. Actual iptables rule in comment below.)
share|improve this question
    
I do not understand. The telnet session is coextensive with the TCP connection, by definition. 'Quit Telnet without sending a FIN' therefore has no ascertainable meaning. –  EJP Oct 4 '12 at 21:53
    
I'm trying to create a 'broken TCP connection' with telnet. –  rdrey Oct 4 '12 at 21:57
1  
So you want to produce a physical network fault without producing a physical network fault. You only have to state it clearly to see that it's a contradiction in terms. –  EJP Oct 4 '12 at 22:04
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@EJP no, he's after something else here. Unfortunately networking stacks live in the kernel and as part of process exit and cleanup (both in Windows and Linux), the kernel will go and FIN all the socket's it thinks you have open, as part of CloseHandle() or close() or whatever... So you have to keep the process's alive, else the kernel takes over. Without doing something like my answer below, you would have to modify the network stack and recompile, or hook the networking functions yourself. My solution below is much easier. –  mattypiper Oct 4 '12 at 22:11
    
@mattypiper I know all that, although I don't see the relevance. What I don't understand is the part about quitting the telnet session without a FIN. Until the telnet session gets a FIN or is made aware of a network fault via an RST it remains alive. Is he trying to provoke a FIN here? –  EJP Oct 4 '12 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do you have to kill the client process? If so, just use netcat and let the processes run in the background. In bash:

for i in $(seq 5) do nc localhost 5001 &; sleep 1; done

This creates 5 TCP clients, with SYNs spaced 1 second. If you need to interact with one of the sessions, you can use

fg $PID

to return one of the netcat's back to the shell foreground.

Another option is an iptables rule:

iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --tcp-flags FIN -j DROP

Yet another option is to use a low level networking tool with raw sockets, such as Scapy. Here's the Python Documentation for Scapy. You'll be doing something similar to TCP SYN scanning, except you need to ACK the SYN-ACK that the server gives you. This will leave the server socket in a "connected" state and you can go on and do other things. The server may ACK you occasionally, but your test program won't care. It will only send SYNs and respond to SYN-ACKs

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I like the idea to just keep the client alive, but I'm trying to test the server-side's keep-alive probe functionality, so the server will be sending SYNs and I'd like the clients to "act dead" and not respond at all. Is this possible, Matt? –  rdrey Oct 4 '12 at 22:18
    
hmmm, again the kernel might take over and send acknowledgements of the SYN on the client process's behalf (yeah, these processes are connected and running, sockets open) and there might be no easy way to get it to "keep quiet". –  rdrey Oct 4 '12 at 22:28
    
I've read up on keep alive probes, replace all mentions of SYNs with ACKs in my comments, please. –  rdrey Oct 4 '12 at 22:36
    
Hmm, then you're going to want to use a raw socket with the help of a tool like Scapy. Here's the Python Documentation for Scapy. You'll be doing something similar to TCP SYN scanning, except you need to ACK the SYN-ACK that the server gives you. This will leave the server socket in a "connected" state and you can go on and do other things. The server may ACK you occasionally, but your test program won't care. It will only send SYNs and respond to SYN-ACKs. –  mattypiper Oct 4 '12 at 22:58
    
Thanks, Scapy looks pretty cool. I wish Unix had a nice raw-socket tool to use to create broken TCP connections, but I will play around with Scapy and make a client "dead socket / fake network problem" myself. –  rdrey Oct 5 '12 at 8:31

You need to disconnect the machine from the network. "Disconnecting" a process will always cause the OS/machine to properly close the socket.

The easiest way to disconnect the machine without physically unplugging the cable is simply to change the machine's IP address.

share|improve this answer
    
I discussed this with a colleague today. How about adding an IP tables / firewall rule to instantly cut off all traffic to a port (on which the client is listening) on localhost? –  rdrey Oct 5 '12 at 17:44
    
That'll work, too. Anything that will simply stop the flow of packets for the protocol/local-addr/local-port/remote-addr/remote-port tuple will do the job. –  Brian White Oct 5 '12 at 17:48
    
An iptables rule is a great idea. Maybe just drop all outbound FINs? iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --tcp-flags FIN -j DROP. I'm sad you aren't using scapy though. :( –  mattypiper Oct 5 '12 at 19:21
    
Sorry, matt. I'm sure there'll be another opportunity to try out scapy some time. Please update your answer with your iptables rule, then I can leave it as the accepted answer ;) –  rdrey Oct 5 '12 at 20:01

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