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I was wondering how I could grep all the characters that don't fit a set of characters you want to give it.

For example, say I have a file that has the following text

XXXXX0000000HelloXXXXXX
MyXXXName0000Is00000000
XXXXXJamesXXX0X0X0X0XXX

I want it to print out "HelloMyNameIsJames" or those characters in some other fashion (if it comes out as one character per line, I would be fine with that).

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Raymosrunerx

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So in this case you would want to eliminate the X's and 0's? –  CrazyCasta Oct 4 '12 at 22:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
tr -d X0 < input 

Output:

Hello
MyNameIs
James

To remove line ends too:

tr -d 'X0\n' < input 

Ouput

HelloMyNameIsJames

(no trailing line end)

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Another solution, one character per line, using grep (if your grep supports the -o):

grep -o '[^X0]'
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If the lines are contained in file testdata, the following command will print a line each as shown:

sed -e 's/[0X]//g' testdata | xargs
Hello MyNameIs James

Hope this satisfies your needs!

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If you'd prefer one word per line, here's one way using GNU grep:

grep -oP '(?<=[0X]|\b)[^0X]+(?=[0X]|\b)' file.txt

Results:

Hello
My
Name
Is
James

You can use sed to neaten up your output:

< file.txt grep -oP '(?<=[0X]|\b)[^0X]+(?=[0X]|\b)' | sed ':loop; N; $!b loop; s/\n/ /g'

Results:

Hello My Name Is James
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try:

sed -e 's/[X0]//g' input

grep isn't going to remove stuff for you.

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See my answer for GNU grep solution. –  choroba Oct 4 '12 at 22:11

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