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I have such code:

class Base:
  def do( self ):
    self._member1 = 0
    self._member2 = 1

class Derived1(Base):
  def do(self):
    Base.do(self)
    self._member3 = 0
    self._member4 = 1

class Derived2(Base):
  def do(self):
    Base.do(self)
    self._member3 = 2
    self._member4 = 3

class Derived3(Base):
  def do(self):
    Base.do(self)
    self._member3 = 9
    self._member4 = 3

etc. Here is what I've done:

class Base(object):
  '''Base class.'''
  def do(self):
    self._member1 = 0
    self._member2 = 1

class Derived1(Base): pass
class Derived2(Base): pass
class Derived3(Base): pass
class Derived4(Base): pass

class DerivedFactory(object):
  '''Factory to create derived classes.'''
  members = \
  {
    1: (Derived1, 0, 1),
    2: (Derived2, 4, 5),
    3: (Derived3, 6, 7),
    4: (Derived4, 8, 9),
  }

  def do(self, key=1):
    derived = self.members[key][0]()
    derived.do() # Perform method from Base
    derived._member3 = self.members[key][1]
    derived._member4 = self.members[key][2]
    print(derived)
    print('\t%s' % derived.__dict__)

if __name__ == '__main__':
  factory = DerivedFactory()
  for key in range(1, 5):
    derived = factory.do(key)

However, it is not perfect as you see. I need to declare Derived1, Derived2, etc. Also it seems to be overcomplicated. Do you have any ideas on how to imporve this code? Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As far as I can tell you are just interested in reducing the duplicated code, here is one option that is equivalent to your top piece of code:

class Base:
    def do( self ):
        self._member1 = 0
        self._member2 = 1

def make_do(a, b):
    def do(self):
        Base.do(self)
        self._member3 = a
        self._member4 = b
    return do

class Derived1(Base):
    do = make_do(0, 1)

class Derived2(Base):
    do = make_do(2, 3)

class Derived3(Base):
    do = make_do(9, 3)

Shorter version suggested by Oren in comments (note that for this to work, Base needs to be a new-style class):

class Base(object):
    def do( self ):
        self._member1 = 0
        self._member2 = 1

def make_do(a, b):
    def do(self):
        Base.do(self)
        self._member3 = a
        self._member4 = b
    return do

def make_derived(name, a, b):
    return type(name, (Base,), {'do': make_do(a,b)})

Derived1 = make_derived('Derived1', 0, 1)
Derived2 = make_derived('Derived2', 2, 3)
Derived3 = make_derived('Derived3', 9, 3)

And here is a decorator version, since it was asked for in comments:

class Base(object):
    def do( self ):
        self._member1 = 0
        self._member2 = 1

def add_do(a, b):
    def do(self):
        Base.do(self)
        self._member3 = a
        self._member4 = b
    def deco(cls):
        return type(cls.__name__, (Base,), {'do': do})
    return deco

@add_do(0, 1)
class Derived1(Base): pass

@add_do(2, 3)
class Derived2(Base): pass

@add_do(9, 3)
class Derived3(Base): pass

Another decorator version, that overrides the sub-classes' do instead of creating a new type (it also lets you use old-style classes):

class Base:
    def do( self ):
        self._member1 = 0
        self._member2 = 1

def add_do(a, b):
    def deco(cls):
        original_do = cls.do
        def do(self):
            original_do(self)
            self._member3 = a
            self._member4 = b
        cls.do = do
        return cls
    return deco

@add_do(0, 1)
class Derived1(Base): pass

@add_do(2, 3)
class Derived2(Base): pass

@add_do(9, 3)
class Derived3(Base): pass
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2  
You can also use the type function to create the classes dynamically: def make_derived(name, a, b): type(name, (Base,), {'do': make_do(a,b) }) Derived1 = make_derived('Derived1', 0, 1) Derived2 = make_derived('Derived2', 2, 3) Derived3 = make_derived('Derived3', 9, 3) –  Oren Oct 4 '12 at 22:25
    
Good suggestion, added to my answer. –  Andrew Clark Oct 4 '12 at 22:35
    
Am I right that it can be done using decorators? –  ghostmansd Oct 4 '12 at 22:39
    
@Oren Indeed, it's called metaprogramming :) –  Lukas Graf Oct 4 '12 at 22:44
    
Added a version with decorators to my answer (metaclasses are not used). –  Andrew Clark Oct 4 '12 at 22:48

If you are just using the classes as data containers with a method that operates on the data you might be better off with a different pattern:

from collections import namedtuple

Base = namedtuple("Base", ["member1", "member2"])
Derived = namedtuple("Derived", Base._fields + ("member3", "member4"))

def do(base_or_derived):

    print "Member1:", base_or_derived.member1
    print "Member2:", base_or_derived.member2

    if not isinstance(base_or_derived, Base):
        print "Member3:", base_or_derived.member3
        print "Member4:", base_or_derived.member4

if __name__ == "__main__":
    base = Base(0, 1)
    derived1 = Derived(0, 1, 0, 1)
    derived2 = Derived(0, 1, 2, 3)
    derived3 = Derived(0, 1, 9, 3)

    for item in [base, derived1, derived2, derived3]:
        do(item)
share|improve this answer
    
No, members must be initialized only in do method. –  ghostmansd Oct 4 '12 at 22:37

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